Outcomes of CPR in the presence of partial occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery

Giuseppe Ristagno, Wanchun Tang, Ting Yan Xu, Shijie Sun, Max Harry Weil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To develop a clinically relevant experimental model of cardiac arrest and CPR in which a partial occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) is maintained during the resuscitation procedure and the initial post-resuscitation interval. Materials and methods: Ventricular fibrillation (VF) was induced by LAD occlusion with a balloon tipped catheter in 16 domestic male pigs weighing 41 ± 2 kg. After a 7 min interval of untreated VF, the LAD balloon occlusion was deflated and the catheter withdrawn in eight animals. The LAD balloon was deflated in the remaining eight animals but the catheter was kept in place in order to maintain a partial occlusion of the LAD, which was approximately 75% of the internal lumen. CPR, including chest compressions and ventilations with oxygen, was then performed for 2 min before a defibrillation attempt. Thirty minutes following successful resuscitation the LAD catheter was withdrawn in the animals with partial occlusion of the LAD. Results: In the animals that had the LAD totally unoccluded before to starting CPR, each animal was resuscitated successfully and survived for more than 72 h with better neurological recovery during the initial 24 h post-resuscitation than did the partially occluded group. When a partial occlusion of the LAD was maintained during CPR, six of eight animals were resuscitated and only four of these survived for 72 h. A significantly greater number of electrical shocks prior to ROSC were required when a partial occlusion of the LAD was maintained during CPR. Significantly greater severity of post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction was observed in animals resuscitated with a partial occlusion of the LAD. Conclusions: In this model of prolonged untreated cardiac arrest, maintaining a partial occlusion of the LAD during CPR and the initial post-resuscitation interval required a greater number of shocks before ROSC, increased severity of post-resuscitation myocardial dysfunction significantly and yielded less favourable outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)357-365
Number of pages9
JournalResuscitation
Volume75
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • CPR
  • Defibrillation
  • LAD
  • Myocardial function
  • Outcome
  • Survival
  • Ventricular fibrillation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Nursing(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Outcomes of CPR in the presence of partial occlusion of left anterior descending coronary artery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this