Ovarian adrenergic nerves directly participate in the control of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and β-adrenergic receptors during puberty: A biochemical and autoradiographic study

B. Marchetti, M. Cioni, M. Badr, N. Folléa, G. Pelletier

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Abstract

The rat ovary receives sympathetic innervation from the superior ovarian nerve (SON) and the plexus nerve (OP). To examine the possibility of a direct adrenergic mechanism controlling ovarian receptor distribution during the onset of puberty, we have studied the acute (48-h) effect of unilateral nervotomy (combined section of SON and OP nerves) on ovarian LHRH and β-adrenergic receptor concentrations and distribution using both radioreceptor assays and in vitro autoradiography. Ovarian LHRH receptor concentration increased sharply btween 12 and 20 days of age. At this time receptors were mostly associated with follicles and interstitial cells, whereas at 37 days of age, when a measurable loss in the receptor concentration was observed, light and diffuse autoradiographic labeling of receptors was also found in the corpora lutea. Complete removal of adrenergic input to the gland produced a sharp decrease in LHRH-binding activity within the denervated ovary at each time interval studied, with no effect in the innervated contralateral gland. Autoradiographic data also revealed a decrease in both the number of labeled follicles and the intensity of the labeling. β-Adrenergic receptor concentration increased progressively between days 12 and 27, reaching a peak value at 37 days of age. Labeling was very weak at 12 days of age and increased progressively at 20 and 27 days of age. At this time, receptors were mostly localized by autoradiography in the interstitial cells, while at 37 days of age corpora lutea were strongly labeled. Ovarian β-adrenergic receptors showed a marked drop when acutely deprived of their neural tone, as illustrated by the 2- to 3-fold decrease in receptor-binding capacity within the denervated gland. The autoradiographic data also showed marked changes in β-adrenergic receptor distribution, specially at 37 days of age. At this time, the labeling of corpora lutea was markedly decreased in denervated ovaries. The present results clearly demonstrate that complete removal of ovarian adrenergic tone produces a profound decrease in the concentrations of LHRH and β-adrenergic receptors within the ovary, although it cannot be excluded that peptidergic factors also arriving via the SON and OP could have some influence on the regulation of these receptors. The results support the concept of a direct involvement of the central nervous system in ovarian function. They also suggest that during ovarian development a neural efferent system might be involved in the adjustment of ovarian responsiveness to stimulation by the gonadotropins via changes in receptor content and/or distribution in the different ovarian compartments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)219-226
Number of pages8
JournalEndocrinology
Volume121
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1987

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LHRH Receptors
Puberty
Adrenergic Agents
Adrenergic Receptors
Ovary
Corpus Luteum
Autoradiography
Radioligand Assay
Gonadotropins
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
Central Nervous System
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Ovarian adrenergic nerves directly participate in the control of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and β-adrenergic receptors during puberty : A biochemical and autoradiographic study. / Marchetti, B.; Cioni, M.; Badr, M.; Folléa, N.; Pelletier, G.

In: Endocrinology, Vol. 121, No. 1, 1987, p. 219-226.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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