Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

393 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration. (C) 2000 Saunders Company.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-29
Number of pages3
JournalMetabolism
Volume49
Issue number2 SUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Free Radicals
Oxidative Stress
Insulin
Hyperglycemia
Insulin Resistance
Glucose
Hyperinsulinism
Diabetes Complications
Vitamin E
Adipocytes
Hydrogen Peroxide
Ascorbic Acid
Blood Glucose
Homeostasis
Cell Membrane

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation. / Ceriello, A.

In: Metabolism, Vol. 49, No. 2 SUPPL. 1, 2000, p. 27-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ceriello, A 2000, 'Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation', Metabolism, vol. 49, no. 2 SUPPL. 1, pp. 27-29.
Ceriello, A. / Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation. In: Metabolism. 2000 ; Vol. 49, No. 2 SUPPL. 1. pp. 27-29.
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