Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population

Heather M. Ochs-Balcom, Brydon J B Grant, Paola Muti, Christopher T. Sempos, Jo L. Freudenheim, Richard W. Browne, Maurizio Trevisan, Licia Iacoviello, Patricia A. Cassano, Holger J. Schünemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Studies have shown increased oxidative stress in patients with chronic airflow limitation; however, the population-based evidence for the association of oxidative stress with pulmonary function is limited. The authors analyzed the association of plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2- carboxylic acid (Trolox)-equivalent antioxidant capacity with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity using data collected from 1996 to 2000 in a general population sample from western New York State (n = 2,346). After adjustment for covariates including smoking status, lifetime pack-years of smoking, education, weight, and eosinophils, multivariate analysis showed an inverse association of TBARS with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity as the percentage of the predicted value (FEV1% and FVC%, respectively), positive associations of glutathione peroxidase with FEV1% and FVC%, and an inverse association of glutathione with FEV1% in men (p <0.05). The associations of TBARS and glutathione peroxidase with FVC% in men remained statistically significant after adjustment for serum carotenoid levels. There were no statistically significant associations of oxidative stress with pulmonary function in women. These results suggest that oxidative stress may be associated with airflow limitation in men, and that gender differences may exist in the relation of oxidative stress to pulmonary function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1137-1145
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Epidemiology
Volume162
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2005

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Oxidative Stress
Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances
Lung
Glutathione Peroxidase
Population
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Glutathione
Smoking
Carotenoids
Eosinophils
Multivariate Analysis
Antioxidants
Education
Weights and Measures
Serum
6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid

Keywords

  • Forced expiratory volume
  • Glutathione
  • Glutathione peroxidase
  • Oxidative stress
  • Respiratory function tests
  • Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances
  • Vital capacity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Ochs-Balcom, H. M., Grant, B. J. B., Muti, P., Sempos, C. T., Freudenheim, J. L., Browne, R. W., ... Schünemann, H. J. (2005). Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population. American Journal of Epidemiology, 162(12), 1137-1145. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi339

Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population. / Ochs-Balcom, Heather M.; Grant, Brydon J B; Muti, Paola; Sempos, Christopher T.; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Browne, Richard W.; Trevisan, Maurizio; Iacoviello, Licia; Cassano, Patricia A.; Schünemann, Holger J.

In: American Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 162, No. 12, 12.2005, p. 1137-1145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ochs-Balcom, HM, Grant, BJB, Muti, P, Sempos, CT, Freudenheim, JL, Browne, RW, Trevisan, M, Iacoviello, L, Cassano, PA & Schünemann, HJ 2005, 'Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population', American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 162, no. 12, pp. 1137-1145. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi339
Ochs-Balcom HM, Grant BJB, Muti P, Sempos CT, Freudenheim JL, Browne RW et al. Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population. American Journal of Epidemiology. 2005 Dec;162(12):1137-1145. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwi339
Ochs-Balcom, Heather M. ; Grant, Brydon J B ; Muti, Paola ; Sempos, Christopher T. ; Freudenheim, Jo L. ; Browne, Richard W. ; Trevisan, Maurizio ; Iacoviello, Licia ; Cassano, Patricia A. ; Schünemann, Holger J. / Oxidative stress and pulmonary function in the general population. In: American Journal of Epidemiology. 2005 ; Vol. 162, No. 12. pp. 1137-1145.
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