Oxidative Stress in Elderly with Different Cognitive Status: My Mind Project

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been associated with cognitive status in humans and have been proposed to guide prognosis/treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare oxidative stress status in the plasma of mild-moderate AD, MCI, and healthy elderly with normal cognition (HE) undergoing a non-pharmacological intervention including multi-modal cognitive training ("My Mind Project"). Methods: A prospective randomized trial involving 321 elderly people enrolled in Marche Region, Italy. Each subject was randomly assigned to an experimental (cognitive training) or to a control group. Cognitive performances and biomarkers have been analyzed before intervention (baseline), immediately after termination (follow-up 1), after 6 months (follow-up 2), and after 2 years (follow-up 3). The biological antioxidant potential (BAP) to Diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROM) ratio has been used as an indicator of oxidative stress status and as outcome variable. Results: We have found no differences in the oxidative status among AD, MCI, and HE. Neither did we find a significant effect of the intervention within experimental groups. Gender was the sole factor with a strong significant effect on BAP/d-ROM. Conclusions: Based on these results, the utility of biomarkers of oxidative stress to guide prognosis/treatment in AD or MCI seems to be limited by lack of specificity, large interindividual variability, and gender bias.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1405-1414
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Alzheimer's Disease
Volume63
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Alzheimer Disease
Oxidative Stress
Biomarkers
Antioxidants
Oxygen
Sexism
Cognition
Italy
Control Groups
Cognitive Dysfunction
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cognitive dysfunction
  • oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{9d75957bd02342669825dffb08a94cc2,
title = "Oxidative Stress in Elderly with Different Cognitive Status: My Mind Project",
abstract = "Background: Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been associated with cognitive status in humans and have been proposed to guide prognosis/treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare oxidative stress status in the plasma of mild-moderate AD, MCI, and healthy elderly with normal cognition (HE) undergoing a non-pharmacological intervention including multi-modal cognitive training ({"}My Mind Project{"}). Methods: A prospective randomized trial involving 321 elderly people enrolled in Marche Region, Italy. Each subject was randomly assigned to an experimental (cognitive training) or to a control group. Cognitive performances and biomarkers have been analyzed before intervention (baseline), immediately after termination (follow-up 1), after 6 months (follow-up 2), and after 2 years (follow-up 3). The biological antioxidant potential (BAP) to Diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROM) ratio has been used as an indicator of oxidative stress status and as outcome variable. Results: We have found no differences in the oxidative status among AD, MCI, and HE. Neither did we find a significant effect of the intervention within experimental groups. Gender was the sole factor with a strong significant effect on BAP/d-ROM. Conclusions: Based on these results, the utility of biomarkers of oxidative stress to guide prognosis/treatment in AD or MCI seems to be limited by lack of specificity, large interindividual variability, and gender bias.",
keywords = "Aging, Alzheimer's disease, cognitive dysfunction, oxidative stress",
author = "Patrizia Fattoretti and Marco Malavolta and Paolo Fabbietti and Roberta Papa and Robertina Giacconi and Laura Costarelli and Roberta Galeazzi and Cristina Paoloni and Demetrio Postacchini and Fabrizia Lattanzio and Cinzia Giuli",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3233/JAD-171117",
language = "English",
volume = "63",
pages = "1405--1414",
journal = "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease",
issn = "1387-2877",
publisher = "IOS Press",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oxidative Stress in Elderly with Different Cognitive Status

T2 - My Mind Project

AU - Fattoretti, Patrizia

AU - Malavolta, Marco

AU - Fabbietti, Paolo

AU - Papa, Roberta

AU - Giacconi, Robertina

AU - Costarelli, Laura

AU - Galeazzi, Roberta

AU - Paoloni, Cristina

AU - Postacchini, Demetrio

AU - Lattanzio, Fabrizia

AU - Giuli, Cinzia

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been associated with cognitive status in humans and have been proposed to guide prognosis/treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare oxidative stress status in the plasma of mild-moderate AD, MCI, and healthy elderly with normal cognition (HE) undergoing a non-pharmacological intervention including multi-modal cognitive training ("My Mind Project"). Methods: A prospective randomized trial involving 321 elderly people enrolled in Marche Region, Italy. Each subject was randomly assigned to an experimental (cognitive training) or to a control group. Cognitive performances and biomarkers have been analyzed before intervention (baseline), immediately after termination (follow-up 1), after 6 months (follow-up 2), and after 2 years (follow-up 3). The biological antioxidant potential (BAP) to Diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROM) ratio has been used as an indicator of oxidative stress status and as outcome variable. Results: We have found no differences in the oxidative status among AD, MCI, and HE. Neither did we find a significant effect of the intervention within experimental groups. Gender was the sole factor with a strong significant effect on BAP/d-ROM. Conclusions: Based on these results, the utility of biomarkers of oxidative stress to guide prognosis/treatment in AD or MCI seems to be limited by lack of specificity, large interindividual variability, and gender bias.

AB - Background: Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been associated with cognitive status in humans and have been proposed to guide prognosis/treatment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Objective: The aim of this study was to compare oxidative stress status in the plasma of mild-moderate AD, MCI, and healthy elderly with normal cognition (HE) undergoing a non-pharmacological intervention including multi-modal cognitive training ("My Mind Project"). Methods: A prospective randomized trial involving 321 elderly people enrolled in Marche Region, Italy. Each subject was randomly assigned to an experimental (cognitive training) or to a control group. Cognitive performances and biomarkers have been analyzed before intervention (baseline), immediately after termination (follow-up 1), after 6 months (follow-up 2), and after 2 years (follow-up 3). The biological antioxidant potential (BAP) to Diacron reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROM) ratio has been used as an indicator of oxidative stress status and as outcome variable. Results: We have found no differences in the oxidative status among AD, MCI, and HE. Neither did we find a significant effect of the intervention within experimental groups. Gender was the sole factor with a strong significant effect on BAP/d-ROM. Conclusions: Based on these results, the utility of biomarkers of oxidative stress to guide prognosis/treatment in AD or MCI seems to be limited by lack of specificity, large interindividual variability, and gender bias.

KW - Aging

KW - Alzheimer's disease

KW - cognitive dysfunction

KW - oxidative stress

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048626114&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048626114&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3233/JAD-171117

DO - 10.3233/JAD-171117

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85048626114

VL - 63

SP - 1405

EP - 1414

JO - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

JF - Journal of Alzheimer's Disease

SN - 1387-2877

IS - 4

ER -