P66Shc, mitochondria, and the generation of reactive oxygen species

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS), mainly originated from mitochondrial respiration, are critical inducers of oxidative damage and involved in tissue dysfunction. It is not clear, however, whether oxidative stress is the result of an active gene program or it is the by-product of physiological processes. Recent findings demonstrate that ROS are produced by mitochondria in a controlled way through specialized enzymes, including p66Shc, and take part in cellular process aimed to ensure adaptation and fitness. Therefore, genes generating specifically ROS are selected determinants of life span in response to different environmental conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMethods in Enzymology
Pages99-110
Number of pages12
Volume528
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Publication series

NameMethods in Enzymology
Volume528
ISSN (Print)00766879
ISSN (Electronic)15577988

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Keywords

  • Aging
  • Apoptosis
  • Mitochondria
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Trinei, M., Migliaccio, E., Bernardi, P., Paolucci, F., Pelicci, P., & Giorgio, M. (2013). P66Shc, mitochondria, and the generation of reactive oxygen species. In Methods in Enzymology (Vol. 528, pp. 99-110). (Methods in Enzymology; Vol. 528). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-405881-1.00006-9