Pain Self-Efficacy and Fear of Movement are Similarly Associated with Pain Intensity and Disability in Italian Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain

Silvano Ferrari, Alessandro Chiarotto, Marta Pellizzer, Carla Vanti, Marco Monticone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-sectional associations of pain self-efficacy and fear of movement with pain intensity and disability in Italian patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). One hundred and three adult outpatients with nonspecific CLBP were included in the study. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics were assessed, together with Italian versions of self-reported questionnaires to measure the four constructs of interest. Multiple linear regression models were built with psychosocial constructs as main determinants, and pain intensity and disability as outcomes. Potential confounding of socio-demographic and clinical characteristics was assessed. Pain self-efficacy and fear of movement displayed moderate correlations with pain intensity (r = -0.41 and 0.42, respectively) and disability (-0.55 and 0.54). Association models adjusted for pain intensity showed that both pain self-efficacy (β = -0.35, 95% CI = -0.5; -0.2, R2 = 41%) and fear of movement (β = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.36; 0.93, R2 = 40%) are significantly and strongly associated with disability. Pain self-efficacy was no longer significantly associated with pain intensity when disability was added as a confounder to the model, whereas fear of movement retained its significant association (β = 0.06, 95% CI = 0.00;0.11, R2 = 30%). No other variables acted as confounders in these associations. Pain self-efficacy and fear of movement are very similarly associated with main outcomes in this sample of Italian patients with CLBP. The results of this study suggest that both psychosocial constructs should be considered in clinical management. Future studies should investigate whether these findings can be replicated in other samples, in longitudinal designs and if other variables not measured in this study confound the associations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPain Practice
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Chronic low back pain
  • Disability
  • Fear of movement
  • Pain intensity
  • Pain self-efficacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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