Pancreas transplantation

Long-term results

R. Caldara, R. Sanseverino, N. Lefrancois, X. Martin, S. Martinenghi, J. M. Dubernard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rationale behind pancreatic transplantation is to provide a self-regulated, endogenous source of insulin and other islet hormones, thus restoring normal metabolism with the ultimate goals of prevention, stabilization or reversal of secondary degenerative complications. We report clinical and metabolic data of 8 patients submitted to simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation in our institute, who had a pancreatic graft function for 4 (1 case) and 5 (7 cases) years. To assess the impact of transplanted pancreatic mass on long-term function, we also included 10 patients from a comparative study between segmental pancreas transplantation (group A, 5 pts) and whole pancreas with enteric diversion transplantation (group B, 5 pts), who had pancreatic function for 2 and 3 yr. All patients are alive. Seven of these patients are off insulin, while one patient lost pancreatic function during an operation performed to correct an arterial stenosis of the graft. HbAlc levels were normal during the entire follow-up period (5.2 ± 0.14% at 4 yr; 5.1 ± 0.6% at 5 yr). In 24-hour metabolic profiles we observed near normal blood glucose levels, with good insulin release at 4 yr and a mild hyperglycemia at 5 yr (BG at 9 p.m.: 8.8 ± 1.3 mmol/l). OGTT performed in 5 patients, 4 yr after pancreas transplantation, showed an impaired glucose tolerance, while the same test performed at 5 yr, showed higher values (BG 120 minutes: 14.7 ± 0.2 mmol/l). Group A and group B patients are all alive, with good renal and pancreatic function. The same values of fasting blood glucose and HbAlc were observed at 2 and 3 yr, but an impaired glucose tolerance was observed in group A recipients during OGTT performed at the same time-interval. Nerve conduction velocity improved in the posttransplant period, but whether the improvement is due to treatment of uremia or to the normalization of glucose metabolism is difficult to determine. In the long term, we observed a stabilization of advanced retinopathy, present at the time of transplantation in most of our patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-264
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Transplantation
Volume5
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Pancreas Transplantation
Glucose Intolerance
Transplantation
Insulin
Glucose Tolerance Test
Blood Glucose
Transplants
Metabolome
Uremia
Neural Conduction
Hyperglycemia
Kidney Transplantation
Pancreas
Fasting
Pathologic Constriction
Hormones
Kidney
Glucose

Keywords

  • pancreas transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Caldara, R., Sanseverino, R., Lefrancois, N., Martin, X., Martinenghi, S., & Dubernard, J. M. (1991). Pancreas transplantation: Long-term results. Clinical Transplantation, 5(3), 260-264.

Pancreas transplantation : Long-term results. / Caldara, R.; Sanseverino, R.; Lefrancois, N.; Martin, X.; Martinenghi, S.; Dubernard, J. M.

In: Clinical Transplantation, Vol. 5, No. 3, 1991, p. 260-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Caldara, R, Sanseverino, R, Lefrancois, N, Martin, X, Martinenghi, S & Dubernard, JM 1991, 'Pancreas transplantation: Long-term results', Clinical Transplantation, vol. 5, no. 3, pp. 260-264.
Caldara R, Sanseverino R, Lefrancois N, Martin X, Martinenghi S, Dubernard JM. Pancreas transplantation: Long-term results. Clinical Transplantation. 1991;5(3):260-264.
Caldara, R. ; Sanseverino, R. ; Lefrancois, N. ; Martin, X. ; Martinenghi, S. ; Dubernard, J. M. / Pancreas transplantation : Long-term results. In: Clinical Transplantation. 1991 ; Vol. 5, No. 3. pp. 260-264.
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