Pandemic and seasonal vaccine coverage and effectiveness during the 2009-2010 pandemic influenza in an Italian adult population

Simona Costanzo, Francesco Gianfagna, Mariarosaria Persichillo, Francesca D Lucia, Angelita Verna, Modjenar Djidingar, Sara Magnacca, Francesca Bracone, Marco Olivieri, Maria Benedetta Donati, Giovanni De Gaetano, Licia Iacoviello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives To evaluate the response to pandemic vaccination and seasonal and pandemic vaccine effectiveness (VE) in an Italian adult population, during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Methods Data were recorded by interviewing 19,275 subjects (C35 years), randomly recruited from the general population of the Moli-sani project. Events [influenza-like illness (ILI), hospitalization and death], which had occurred between 1 November 2009 and 31 January 2010 were considered. VE was analyzed by multivariable Poisson regression analysis. Results Pandemic vaccine coverage was very low (2.4%) in subjects at high-flu risk, aged 35-65 years (N = 8,048); there was no significant preventive effect of vaccine against ILI. Seasonal vaccine coverage was 26.6% in the whole population (63% in elderly and 21.9% in middle-aged subjects at high-flu risk). There was a higher risk to develop ILI in middle-age [VE: -17% (95% CI: -35,-1)] or at high flurisk [VE: -17% (95% CI: -39, 2)] vaccinated groups. Conclusions Coverage of pandemic vaccine was very low in a Southern Italy population, with no protective effect against ILI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569-579
Number of pages11
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2012

Keywords

  • Pandemic vaccine Seasonal vaccine Vaccine coverage Vaccine effectiveness Italian adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)

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