Panenteric capsule endoscopy identifies proximal small bowel disease guiding upstaging and treatment intensification in Crohn’s disease: A European multicentre observational cohort study

Foong Way D. Tai, Pierre Ellul, Alfonso Elosua, Ignacio Fernandez-Urien, Gian E. Tontini, Luca Elli, Rami Eliakim, Uri Kopylov, Sara Koo, Clare Parker, Simon Panter, Reena Sidhu, Mark McAlindon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Endoscopically defined mucosal healing in Crohn’s disease is associated with improved outcomes. Panenteric capsule endoscopy enables a single non-invasive assessment of small and large bowel mucosal inflammation. Aims and methods: This multicentre observational study of patients with suspected and established Crohn’s disease examined the feasibility, safety and impact on patient outcomes of panenteric capsule endoscopy in routine clinical practice. The potential role in assessment of disease severity and extent by a comparison with existing clinical and biochemical markers is examined. Results: Panenteric capsule endoscopy was performed on 93 patients (71 with established and 22 with suspected Crohn’s disease). A complete examination occurred in 85% (79/93). Two cases (2.8%) of capsule retention occurred in patients with established Crohn’s disease. Panenteric capsule resulted in management change in 38.7% (36/93) patients, including 64.6% (32/48) of those with an established diagnosis whose disease was active, and all three patients with newly diagnosed Crohn’s disease. Montreal classification was upstaged in 33.8% of patients with established Crohn’s disease and mucosal healing was demonstrated in 15.5%. Proximal small bowel disease upstaged disease in 12.7% and predicted escalation of therapy (odds ratio 40.3, 95% confidence interval 3.6–450.2). Raised C-reactive protein and faecal calprotectin were poorly sensitive in detecting active disease (0.48 and 0.59 respectively). Conclusions: Panenteric capsule endoscopy was feasible in routine practice and the ability to detect proximal small bowel disease may allow better estimation of prognosis and guide treatment intensification. Panenteric capsule endoscopy may be a suitable non-invasive endoscopic investigation in determining disease activity and supporting management decisions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalUnited European Gastroenterology Journal
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • a novel panenteric capsule endoscope
  • endoscopy
  • patient management
  • PillCam Crohn’s
  • proximal small bowel Crohn’s disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Gastroenterology

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