Il coinvolgimento dei genitori nelle cure di fine vita: Studio qualitativo in una Terapia Intensiva Pediatrica

Translated title of the contribution: Parental engagement at the end-of-life: A qualitative study in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

Giulia Lamiani, Julia Menichetti, Ivan Fossati, Alberto Giannini, Edi Prandi, Elena Vegni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction. Patient engagement in care has recently become a much debated topic in the healthcare literature. However, few studies have investigated the process of caregivers' engagement in care. In pediatric intensive care units (PICU), parental engagement at the end-of-life plays a pivotal role and has been encouraged through several policies. However, little is known about parental experience of their engagement in the care process. As a part of a broader project on the quality of pediatric end-of-life care, this study aimed to explore the parental perceptions of engagement. Methods. The study was conducted at the PICU of Policlinico Hospital, Milan. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents whose children died in the PICU between 2007-2010. The interviews were transcribed verbatim. Using a broad definition of engagement taken from the literature, excerpts related to engagement were extracted and then analyzed through content analysis. Results. We conducted 8 interviews with 12 parents. According to the parents' experience, engagement encompassed three dimensions: 1) informative (to know); 2) decisional (to decide); and 3) relational (to be there). These dimensions could alternate or be present with different intensity during the child's hospitalization. Conclusions. Our findings highlighted a multidimensional concept of engagement. The engagement of parents in the end-of-life care seemed to be grounded in their role as parents and seemed a way of fulfilling their role. Parental involvement toward clinicians and the PICU seemed to last over the child's death and be a part of the bereavement process.

Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)143-154
Number of pages12
JournalPsicologia della Salute
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Pediatric Intensive Care Units
Parents
parents
Terminal Care
Interviews
Patient Participation
Bereavement
interview
Caregivers
Hospitalization
Pediatrics
Delivery of Health Care
hospitalization
caregiver
content analysis
experience
death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Il coinvolgimento dei genitori nelle cure di fine vita : Studio qualitativo in una Terapia Intensiva Pediatrica. / Lamiani, Giulia; Menichetti, Julia; Fossati, Ivan; Giannini, Alberto; Prandi, Edi; Vegni, Elena.

In: Psicologia della Salute, No. 3, 2015, p. 143-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lamiani, Giulia ; Menichetti, Julia ; Fossati, Ivan ; Giannini, Alberto ; Prandi, Edi ; Vegni, Elena. / Il coinvolgimento dei genitori nelle cure di fine vita : Studio qualitativo in una Terapia Intensiva Pediatrica. In: Psicologia della Salute. 2015 ; No. 3. pp. 143-154.
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