Parents' presence and parent–infant closeness in 11 neonatal intensive care units in six European countries vary between and within the countries

Simo Raiskila, Anna Axelin, Liis Toome, F.F. Caballero, Bente Silnes Tandberg, Rosario Montirosso, Erik Normann, Boubou Hallberg, Björn Westrup, Uwe Ewald, Liisa Lehtonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: Little is known about the amount of physical parent–infant closeness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), and this study explored that issue in six European countries. Methods: The parents of 328 preterm infants were recruited in 11 NICUs in Finland, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Italy and Spain. They filled in daily diaries about how much time they spent in the NICU, in skin-to-skin contact (SSC) and holding their babies in the first two weeks of their hospitalisation. Results: The parents' NICU presence varied from a median of 3.3 (minimum 0.7–maximum 6.7) to 22.3 (18.7–24.0) hours per day (p < 0.001), SSC varied from 0.3 (0–1.4) to 6.6 (2.2–19.5) hours per day (p < 0.001) and holding varied from 0 (0–1.5) to 3.2 (0–7.4) hours per day (p < 0.001). Longer SSC was associated with singleton babies and more highly educated mothers. Holding the baby for longer was associated with gestational age. The most important factor supporting parent–infant closeness was the opportunity to stay overnight in the NICU. Having other children and the distance from home to the hospital had no impact on parent–infant closeness. Conclusion: Parents spent more time in NICUs if they could stay overnight, underlining the importance that these facilities play in establishing parent–infant closeness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)878-888
Number of pages11
JournalActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics
Volume106
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Parents
Skin
Estonia
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Premature Infants
Spain
Italy
Gestational Age
Hospitalization
Mothers

Keywords

  • Family-centred care
  • Kangaroo care
  • Preterm infants
  • Single-family room parent–infant closeness
  • Skin-to-skin care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Parents' presence and parent–infant closeness in 11 neonatal intensive care units in six European countries vary between and within the countries. / Raiskila, Simo; Axelin, Anna; Toome, Liis; Caballero, F.F.; Tandberg, Bente Silnes; Montirosso, Rosario; Normann, Erik; Hallberg, Boubou; Westrup, Björn; Ewald, Uwe; Lehtonen, Liisa.

In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Vol. 106, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 878-888.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Raiskila, Simo ; Axelin, Anna ; Toome, Liis ; Caballero, F.F. ; Tandberg, Bente Silnes ; Montirosso, Rosario ; Normann, Erik ; Hallberg, Boubou ; Westrup, Björn ; Ewald, Uwe ; Lehtonen, Liisa. / Parents' presence and parent–infant closeness in 11 neonatal intensive care units in six European countries vary between and within the countries. In: Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics. 2017 ; Vol. 106, No. 6. pp. 878-888.
@article{14890ab66ee84ddeb5e25fe22905fdfd,
title = "Parents' presence and parent–infant closeness in 11 neonatal intensive care units in six European countries vary between and within the countries",
abstract = "Aim: Little is known about the amount of physical parent–infant closeness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), and this study explored that issue in six European countries. Methods: The parents of 328 preterm infants were recruited in 11 NICUs in Finland, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Italy and Spain. They filled in daily diaries about how much time they spent in the NICU, in skin-to-skin contact (SSC) and holding their babies in the first two weeks of their hospitalisation. Results: The parents' NICU presence varied from a median of 3.3 (minimum 0.7–maximum 6.7) to 22.3 (18.7–24.0) hours per day (p < 0.001), SSC varied from 0.3 (0–1.4) to 6.6 (2.2–19.5) hours per day (p < 0.001) and holding varied from 0 (0–1.5) to 3.2 (0–7.4) hours per day (p < 0.001). Longer SSC was associated with singleton babies and more highly educated mothers. Holding the baby for longer was associated with gestational age. The most important factor supporting parent–infant closeness was the opportunity to stay overnight in the NICU. Having other children and the distance from home to the hospital had no impact on parent–infant closeness. Conclusion: Parents spent more time in NICUs if they could stay overnight, underlining the importance that these facilities play in establishing parent–infant closeness.",
keywords = "Family-centred care, Kangaroo care, Preterm infants, Single-family room parent–infant closeness, Skin-to-skin care",
author = "Simo Raiskila and Anna Axelin and Liis Toome and F.F. Caballero and Tandberg, {Bente Silnes} and Rosario Montirosso and Erik Normann and Boubou Hallberg and Bj{\"o}rn Westrup and Uwe Ewald and Liisa Lehtonen",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/apa.13798",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "878--888",
journal = "Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics",
issn = "0803-5253",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parents' presence and parent–infant closeness in 11 neonatal intensive care units in six European countries vary between and within the countries

AU - Raiskila, Simo

AU - Axelin, Anna

AU - Toome, Liis

AU - Caballero, F.F.

AU - Tandberg, Bente Silnes

AU - Montirosso, Rosario

AU - Normann, Erik

AU - Hallberg, Boubou

AU - Westrup, Björn

AU - Ewald, Uwe

AU - Lehtonen, Liisa

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Aim: Little is known about the amount of physical parent–infant closeness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), and this study explored that issue in six European countries. Methods: The parents of 328 preterm infants were recruited in 11 NICUs in Finland, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Italy and Spain. They filled in daily diaries about how much time they spent in the NICU, in skin-to-skin contact (SSC) and holding their babies in the first two weeks of their hospitalisation. Results: The parents' NICU presence varied from a median of 3.3 (minimum 0.7–maximum 6.7) to 22.3 (18.7–24.0) hours per day (p < 0.001), SSC varied from 0.3 (0–1.4) to 6.6 (2.2–19.5) hours per day (p < 0.001) and holding varied from 0 (0–1.5) to 3.2 (0–7.4) hours per day (p < 0.001). Longer SSC was associated with singleton babies and more highly educated mothers. Holding the baby for longer was associated with gestational age. The most important factor supporting parent–infant closeness was the opportunity to stay overnight in the NICU. Having other children and the distance from home to the hospital had no impact on parent–infant closeness. Conclusion: Parents spent more time in NICUs if they could stay overnight, underlining the importance that these facilities play in establishing parent–infant closeness.

AB - Aim: Little is known about the amount of physical parent–infant closeness in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), and this study explored that issue in six European countries. Methods: The parents of 328 preterm infants were recruited in 11 NICUs in Finland, Estonia, Sweden, Norway, Italy and Spain. They filled in daily diaries about how much time they spent in the NICU, in skin-to-skin contact (SSC) and holding their babies in the first two weeks of their hospitalisation. Results: The parents' NICU presence varied from a median of 3.3 (minimum 0.7–maximum 6.7) to 22.3 (18.7–24.0) hours per day (p < 0.001), SSC varied from 0.3 (0–1.4) to 6.6 (2.2–19.5) hours per day (p < 0.001) and holding varied from 0 (0–1.5) to 3.2 (0–7.4) hours per day (p < 0.001). Longer SSC was associated with singleton babies and more highly educated mothers. Holding the baby for longer was associated with gestational age. The most important factor supporting parent–infant closeness was the opportunity to stay overnight in the NICU. Having other children and the distance from home to the hospital had no impact on parent–infant closeness. Conclusion: Parents spent more time in NICUs if they could stay overnight, underlining the importance that these facilities play in establishing parent–infant closeness.

KW - Family-centred care

KW - Kangaroo care

KW - Preterm infants

KW - Single-family room parent–infant closeness

KW - Skin-to-skin care

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85017379708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85017379708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/apa.13798

DO - 10.1111/apa.13798

M3 - Article

C2 - 28235152

AN - SCOPUS:85017379708

VL - 106

SP - 878

EP - 888

JO - Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics

JF - Acta Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics

SN - 0803-5253

IS - 6

ER -