Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure

F. Magnifico, G. Pierangeli, G. Barletta, C. Candela, P. Montagna, G. Bonavina, P. Cortelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 51-year-old man presenting with paroxysmal attacks of unilateral sweating for 1 year was studied. Clinical and laboratory findings made the diagnosis of Shapiro or Harlequin syndrome unlikely. The onset of the sweating "crisis" was immediately followed by a progressive decrease in rectal and skin temperature, lasting for about 2 hours. This indicated that hypothermia was related to an abnormal downward shift of the thermoregulatory set point and a delayed effect of mechanisms blocking heat dissipation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1300-1302
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume58
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - Apr 23 2002

Fingerprint

Sweating
Skin Temperature
Hypothermia
Hot Temperature
Shapiro syndrome
Harlequin syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Magnifico, F., Pierangeli, G., Barletta, G., Candela, C., Montagna, P., Bonavina, G., & Cortelli, P. (2002). Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure. Neurology, 58(8), 1300-1302.

Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure. / Magnifico, F.; Pierangeli, G.; Barletta, G.; Candela, C.; Montagna, P.; Bonavina, G.; Cortelli, P.

In: Neurology, Vol. 58, No. 8, 23.04.2002, p. 1300-1302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Magnifico, F, Pierangeli, G, Barletta, G, Candela, C, Montagna, P, Bonavina, G & Cortelli, P 2002, 'Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure', Neurology, vol. 58, no. 8, pp. 1300-1302.
Magnifico F, Pierangeli G, Barletta G, Candela C, Montagna P, Bonavina G et al. Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure. Neurology. 2002 Apr 23;58(8):1300-1302.
Magnifico, F. ; Pierangeli, G. ; Barletta, G. ; Candela, C. ; Montagna, P. ; Bonavina, G. ; Cortelli, P. / Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure. In: Neurology. 2002 ; Vol. 58, No. 8. pp. 1300-1302.
@article{61675bc304a34953bac615eb29b75c02,
title = "Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure",
abstract = "A 51-year-old man presenting with paroxysmal attacks of unilateral sweating for 1 year was studied. Clinical and laboratory findings made the diagnosis of Shapiro or Harlequin syndrome unlikely. The onset of the sweating {"}crisis{"} was immediately followed by a progressive decrease in rectal and skin temperature, lasting for about 2 hours. This indicated that hypothermia was related to an abnormal downward shift of the thermoregulatory set point and a delayed effect of mechanisms blocking heat dissipation.",
author = "F. Magnifico and G. Pierangeli and G. Barletta and C. Candela and P. Montagna and G. Bonavina and P. Cortelli",
year = "2002",
month = "4",
day = "23",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "1300--1302",
journal = "Neurology",
issn = "0028-3878",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Paroxysmal episodic central thermoregulatory failure

AU - Magnifico, F.

AU - Pierangeli, G.

AU - Barletta, G.

AU - Candela, C.

AU - Montagna, P.

AU - Bonavina, G.

AU - Cortelli, P.

PY - 2002/4/23

Y1 - 2002/4/23

N2 - A 51-year-old man presenting with paroxysmal attacks of unilateral sweating for 1 year was studied. Clinical and laboratory findings made the diagnosis of Shapiro or Harlequin syndrome unlikely. The onset of the sweating "crisis" was immediately followed by a progressive decrease in rectal and skin temperature, lasting for about 2 hours. This indicated that hypothermia was related to an abnormal downward shift of the thermoregulatory set point and a delayed effect of mechanisms blocking heat dissipation.

AB - A 51-year-old man presenting with paroxysmal attacks of unilateral sweating for 1 year was studied. Clinical and laboratory findings made the diagnosis of Shapiro or Harlequin syndrome unlikely. The onset of the sweating "crisis" was immediately followed by a progressive decrease in rectal and skin temperature, lasting for about 2 hours. This indicated that hypothermia was related to an abnormal downward shift of the thermoregulatory set point and a delayed effect of mechanisms blocking heat dissipation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0037161255&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0037161255&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11971107

AN - SCOPUS:0037161255

VL - 58

SP - 1300

EP - 1302

JO - Neurology

JF - Neurology

SN - 0028-3878

IS - 8

ER -