Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes: Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure

Arian Saffari, Nancy Daher, Ario Ruprecht, Cinzia De Marco, Paolo Pozzi, Roberto Boffi, Samera H. Hamad, Martin M. Shafer, James J. Schauer, Dane Westerdahl, Constantinos Sioutas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years, electronic cigarettes have gained increasing popularity as alternatives to normal (tobacco-containing) cigarettes. In the present study, particles generated by e-cigarettes and normal cigarettes have been analyzed and the degree of exposure to different chemical agents and their emission rates were quantified. Despite the 10-fold decrease in the total exposure to particulate elements in e-cigarettes compared to normal cigarettes, specific metals (e.g. Ni and Ag) still displayed a higher emission rate from e-cigarettes. Further analysis indicated that the contribution of e-liquid to the emission of these metals is rather minimal, implying that they likely originate from other components of the e-cigarette device or other indoor sources. Organic species had lower emission rates during e-cigarette consumption compared to normal cigarettes. Of particular note was the non-detectable emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-cigarettes, while substantial emission of these species was observed from normal cigarettes. Overall, with the exception of Ni, Zn, and Ag, the consumption of e-cigarettes resulted in a remarkable decrease in secondhand exposure to all metals and organic compounds. Implementing quality control protocols on the manufacture of e-cigarettes would further minimize the emission of metals from these devices and improve their safety and associated health effects. This journal is

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2259-2267
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts
Volume16
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2014

Fingerprint

Tobacco
tobacco
Organic compounds
Tobacco Products
organic compound
Metals
metal
health and safety
rate
comparison
exposure
electronics
quality control
PAH
Equipment and Supplies
fold
liquid
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons
Quality Control
Quality control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes : Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure. / Saffari, Arian; Daher, Nancy; Ruprecht, Ario; De Marco, Cinzia; Pozzi, Paolo; Boffi, Roberto; Hamad, Samera H.; Shafer, Martin M.; Schauer, James J.; Westerdahl, Dane; Sioutas, Constantinos.

In: Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts, Vol. 16, No. 10, 01.10.2014, p. 2259-2267.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saffari, A, Daher, N, Ruprecht, A, De Marco, C, Pozzi, P, Boffi, R, Hamad, SH, Shafer, MM, Schauer, JJ, Westerdahl, D & Sioutas, C 2014, 'Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes: Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure', Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts, vol. 16, no. 10, pp. 2259-2267. https://doi.org/10.1039/c4em00415a
Saffari, Arian ; Daher, Nancy ; Ruprecht, Ario ; De Marco, Cinzia ; Pozzi, Paolo ; Boffi, Roberto ; Hamad, Samera H. ; Shafer, Martin M. ; Schauer, James J. ; Westerdahl, Dane ; Sioutas, Constantinos. / Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes : Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure. In: Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts. 2014 ; Vol. 16, No. 10. pp. 2259-2267.
@article{a2c15a7c016446f580a77a731cab1347,
title = "Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes: Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure",
abstract = "In recent years, electronic cigarettes have gained increasing popularity as alternatives to normal (tobacco-containing) cigarettes. In the present study, particles generated by e-cigarettes and normal cigarettes have been analyzed and the degree of exposure to different chemical agents and their emission rates were quantified. Despite the 10-fold decrease in the total exposure to particulate elements in e-cigarettes compared to normal cigarettes, specific metals (e.g. Ni and Ag) still displayed a higher emission rate from e-cigarettes. Further analysis indicated that the contribution of e-liquid to the emission of these metals is rather minimal, implying that they likely originate from other components of the e-cigarette device or other indoor sources. Organic species had lower emission rates during e-cigarette consumption compared to normal cigarettes. Of particular note was the non-detectable emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-cigarettes, while substantial emission of these species was observed from normal cigarettes. Overall, with the exception of Ni, Zn, and Ag, the consumption of e-cigarettes resulted in a remarkable decrease in secondhand exposure to all metals and organic compounds. Implementing quality control protocols on the manufacture of e-cigarettes would further minimize the emission of metals from these devices and improve their safety and associated health effects. This journal is",
author = "Arian Saffari and Nancy Daher and Ario Ruprecht and {De Marco}, Cinzia and Paolo Pozzi and Roberto Boffi and Hamad, {Samera H.} and Shafer, {Martin M.} and Schauer, {James J.} and Dane Westerdahl and Constantinos Sioutas",
year = "2014",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1039/c4em00415a",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "2259--2267",
journal = "Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts",
issn = "2050-7887",
publisher = "Royal Society of Chemistry",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Particulate metals and organic compounds from electronic and tobacco-containing cigarettes

T2 - Comparison of emission rates and secondhand exposure

AU - Saffari, Arian

AU - Daher, Nancy

AU - Ruprecht, Ario

AU - De Marco, Cinzia

AU - Pozzi, Paolo

AU - Boffi, Roberto

AU - Hamad, Samera H.

AU - Shafer, Martin M.

AU - Schauer, James J.

AU - Westerdahl, Dane

AU - Sioutas, Constantinos

PY - 2014/10/1

Y1 - 2014/10/1

N2 - In recent years, electronic cigarettes have gained increasing popularity as alternatives to normal (tobacco-containing) cigarettes. In the present study, particles generated by e-cigarettes and normal cigarettes have been analyzed and the degree of exposure to different chemical agents and their emission rates were quantified. Despite the 10-fold decrease in the total exposure to particulate elements in e-cigarettes compared to normal cigarettes, specific metals (e.g. Ni and Ag) still displayed a higher emission rate from e-cigarettes. Further analysis indicated that the contribution of e-liquid to the emission of these metals is rather minimal, implying that they likely originate from other components of the e-cigarette device or other indoor sources. Organic species had lower emission rates during e-cigarette consumption compared to normal cigarettes. Of particular note was the non-detectable emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-cigarettes, while substantial emission of these species was observed from normal cigarettes. Overall, with the exception of Ni, Zn, and Ag, the consumption of e-cigarettes resulted in a remarkable decrease in secondhand exposure to all metals and organic compounds. Implementing quality control protocols on the manufacture of e-cigarettes would further minimize the emission of metals from these devices and improve their safety and associated health effects. This journal is

AB - In recent years, electronic cigarettes have gained increasing popularity as alternatives to normal (tobacco-containing) cigarettes. In the present study, particles generated by e-cigarettes and normal cigarettes have been analyzed and the degree of exposure to different chemical agents and their emission rates were quantified. Despite the 10-fold decrease in the total exposure to particulate elements in e-cigarettes compared to normal cigarettes, specific metals (e.g. Ni and Ag) still displayed a higher emission rate from e-cigarettes. Further analysis indicated that the contribution of e-liquid to the emission of these metals is rather minimal, implying that they likely originate from other components of the e-cigarette device or other indoor sources. Organic species had lower emission rates during e-cigarette consumption compared to normal cigarettes. Of particular note was the non-detectable emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from e-cigarettes, while substantial emission of these species was observed from normal cigarettes. Overall, with the exception of Ni, Zn, and Ag, the consumption of e-cigarettes resulted in a remarkable decrease in secondhand exposure to all metals and organic compounds. Implementing quality control protocols on the manufacture of e-cigarettes would further minimize the emission of metals from these devices and improve their safety and associated health effects. This journal is

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84907845685&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84907845685&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1039/c4em00415a

DO - 10.1039/c4em00415a

M3 - Article

C2 - 25180481

AN - SCOPUS:84907845685

VL - 16

SP - 2259

EP - 2267

JO - Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts

JF - Environmental Sciences: Processes and Impacts

SN - 2050-7887

IS - 10

ER -