Passively acquired anti-SSA/Ro antibodies are required for congenital heart block following ovodonation but maternal genes are not

Antonio Brucato, Véronique Ramoni, Silvana Penco, Elena Sala, Jill Buyon, Robert Clancy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Anti-SSA/Ro antibodies are necessary but not sufficient to provoke autoimmune-associated congenital heart block (CHB). Genetic factors are likely contributory. Accordingly, HLA-related candidates and singlenucleotide polymorphisms in the promoter region of tumor necrosis factor α and codon 10 in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) were evaluated in a unique family: the surrogate mother (anti-SSA/Ro positive), the biologic father, and the CHB-affected child (product of ovodonation). There was an HLA mismatch between the affected child and the surrogate mother. However, both the biologic and the surrogate mothers shared DQ2 and the profibrosing leucine polymorphism at codon 10 of TGFβ. In conclusion, we observed that CHB can develop in a genetically unrelated child exposed in utero to anti-SSA/Ro antibodies. Testing for anti-SSA/Ro antibodies might be considered in women undergoing artificial fertilization. It is possible that there is no direct association of maternal genes beyond a contributory role in generating the autoantibody.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3119-3121
Number of pages3
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume62
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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