Pathophysiological role and therapeutic implications of vitamin d in autoimmunity: Focus on chronic autoimmune diseases

Mattia Bellan, Laura Andreoli, Chiara Mele, Pier Paolo Sainaghi, Cristina Rigamonti, Silvia Piantoni, Carla De Benedittis, Gianluca Aimaretti, Mario Pirisi, Paolo Marzullo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Vitamin D is a pleiotropic secosteroid yielding multiple actions in human physiology. Besides the canonical regulatory activity on bone metabolism, several non-classical actions have been described and the ability of vitamin D to partake in the regulation of the immune system is particularly interesting, though far stronger and convincing evidence has been collected in in vitro as compared to in vivo studies. Whether vitamin D is able to regulate at physiological concentrations the human immune system remains unproven to date. Consequently, it is not established if vitamin D status is a factor involved in the pathogenesis of immune-mediated diseases and if cholecalciferol supplementation acts as an adjuvant for autoimmune diseases. The development of autoimmunity is a heterogeneous process, which may involve different organs and systems with a wide range of clinical implications. In the present paper, we reviewed the current evidences regarding vitamin D role in the pathogenesis and management of different autoimmune diseases.

Original languageEnglish
Article number789
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Addison’s disease
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Autoimmune liver disease
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease
  • Autoimmunity
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Spondyloarthritis
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Type 1 diabetes mellitus
  • Vitamin D

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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