Patients with ALS can use sensorimotor rhythms to operate a brain-computer interface

A. Kübler, F. Nijboer, J. Mellinger, T. M. Vaughan, H. Pawelzik, G. Schalk, D. J. McFarland, N. Birbaumer, J. R. Wolpaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People with severe motor disabilities can maintain an acceptable quality of life if they can communicate. Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs), which do not depend on muscle control, can provide communication. Four people severely disabled by ALS learned to operate a BCI with EEG rhythms recorded over sensorimotor cortex. These results suggest that a sensorimotor rhythm-based BCI could help maintain quality of life for people with ALS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1775-1777
Number of pages3
JournalNeurology
Volume64
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 24 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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    Kübler, A., Nijboer, F., Mellinger, J., Vaughan, T. M., Pawelzik, H., Schalk, G., McFarland, D. J., Birbaumer, N., & Wolpaw, J. R. (2005). Patients with ALS can use sensorimotor rhythms to operate a brain-computer interface. Neurology, 64(10), 1775-1777. https://doi.org/10.1212/01.WNL.0000158616.43002.6D