Patterns of dissociation in comprehension and production of nouns and verbs

G. Miceli, M. C. Silveri, U. Nocentini, A. Caramazza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

214 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The implications of these results for the functional architecture of the lexical system are straightforward: not only is it the case that the lexicon is organized by grammatical class but this organizational principle is duplicated for input and output subcomponents of the lexical system (see Caramazza 1988, for discussion). A functional architecture of the lexical system of the form proposed here has considerable prima facie plausibility. After all, we want the relevant lexical distinctions to be represented at just those levels where they would serve a useful purpose. In the present case we want form class information to be represented both in the input and output components of the lexicon so that it may be exploited in sentence comprehension (input) and sentence production (output).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-358
Number of pages8
JournalAphasiology
Volume2
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - 1988

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comprehension
organizational principle
Verbs
Nouns
Dissociation
Lexicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Miceli, G., Silveri, M. C., Nocentini, U., & Caramazza, A. (1988). Patterns of dissociation in comprehension and production of nouns and verbs. Aphasiology, 2(3-4), 351-358.

Patterns of dissociation in comprehension and production of nouns and verbs. / Miceli, G.; Silveri, M. C.; Nocentini, U.; Caramazza, A.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 2, No. 3-4, 1988, p. 351-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Miceli, G, Silveri, MC, Nocentini, U & Caramazza, A 1988, 'Patterns of dissociation in comprehension and production of nouns and verbs', Aphasiology, vol. 2, no. 3-4, pp. 351-358.
Miceli, G. ; Silveri, M. C. ; Nocentini, U. ; Caramazza, A. / Patterns of dissociation in comprehension and production of nouns and verbs. In: Aphasiology. 1988 ; Vol. 2, No. 3-4. pp. 351-358.
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