Patterns of recovery and change in verbal and nonverbal functions in a case of crossed aphasia: Implications for models of functional brain lateralization and localization

L. Trojano, P. Balbi, G. Russo, R. Elefante

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a 2-year verbal and nonverbal follow-up of a crossed aphasic patient. The patient had suffered from widespread ischemic damage in the area of right middle cerebral artery, with a parieto-temporal lesion. Three months post-onset he showed classical Wernicke's aphasia associated with oral, limb and constructional apraxia and left hemineglect. However, follow-up findings showed a complex, dynamic pattern entirely consistent with cognitive models of language and nonlanguage abilities. Current models of functional brain lateralizations could not satisfactorily account for such longitudinal, fine- grain observations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)637-661
Number of pages25
JournalBrain and Language
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Aphasia
speech disorder
brain
Wernicke Aphasia
Apraxias
Aptitude
Middle Cerebral Artery
Brain
agricultural product
damages
Language
Extremities
ability
language
Recovery
Crossed Aphasia
Lateralization
Localization
Lesion
Apraxia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

@article{8157bec8a63f4092a1534abd62480057,
title = "Patterns of recovery and change in verbal and nonverbal functions in a case of crossed aphasia: Implications for models of functional brain lateralization and localization",
abstract = "We present a 2-year verbal and nonverbal follow-up of a crossed aphasic patient. The patient had suffered from widespread ischemic damage in the area of right middle cerebral artery, with a parieto-temporal lesion. Three months post-onset he showed classical Wernicke's aphasia associated with oral, limb and constructional apraxia and left hemineglect. However, follow-up findings showed a complex, dynamic pattern entirely consistent with cognitive models of language and nonlanguage abilities. Current models of functional brain lateralizations could not satisfactorily account for such longitudinal, fine- grain observations.",
author = "L. Trojano and P. Balbi and G. Russo and R. Elefante",
year = "1994",
doi = "10.1006/brln.1994.1035",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "637--661",
journal = "Brain and Language",
issn = "0093-934X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of recovery and change in verbal and nonverbal functions in a case of crossed aphasia

T2 - Implications for models of functional brain lateralization and localization

AU - Trojano, L.

AU - Balbi, P.

AU - Russo, G.

AU - Elefante, R.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - We present a 2-year verbal and nonverbal follow-up of a crossed aphasic patient. The patient had suffered from widespread ischemic damage in the area of right middle cerebral artery, with a parieto-temporal lesion. Three months post-onset he showed classical Wernicke's aphasia associated with oral, limb and constructional apraxia and left hemineglect. However, follow-up findings showed a complex, dynamic pattern entirely consistent with cognitive models of language and nonlanguage abilities. Current models of functional brain lateralizations could not satisfactorily account for such longitudinal, fine- grain observations.

AB - We present a 2-year verbal and nonverbal follow-up of a crossed aphasic patient. The patient had suffered from widespread ischemic damage in the area of right middle cerebral artery, with a parieto-temporal lesion. Three months post-onset he showed classical Wernicke's aphasia associated with oral, limb and constructional apraxia and left hemineglect. However, follow-up findings showed a complex, dynamic pattern entirely consistent with cognitive models of language and nonlanguage abilities. Current models of functional brain lateralizations could not satisfactorily account for such longitudinal, fine- grain observations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028360769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028360769&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1006/brln.1994.1035

DO - 10.1006/brln.1994.1035

M3 - Article

C2 - 8044680

AN - SCOPUS:0028360769

VL - 46

SP - 637

EP - 661

JO - Brain and Language

JF - Brain and Language

SN - 0093-934X

IS - 4

ER -