Patterns of recurrence of early breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status

A therapeutic target for a quarter of a century

Olivia Pagani, Karen N. Price, Richard D. Gelber, Monica Castiglione-Gertsch, Stig B. Holmberg, Jurij Lindtner, Beat Thürlimann, John Collins, Martin F. Fey, Alan S. Coates, Aron Goldhirsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The current therapeutic strategy in breast cancer is to identify a target, such as estrogen receptor (ER) status, for tailoring treatments. We investigated the patterns of recurrence with respect to ER status for patients treated in two randomized trials with 25 years' median follow-up. In the ER-negative subpopulations most breast cancer events occurred within the first 5-7 years after randomization, while in the ER-positive subpopulations breast cancer events were spread through 10 years. In the ER-positive subpopulation, 1 year endocrine treatment alone significantly prolonged disease-free survival (DFS) with no additional benefit observed by adding 1 year of chemotherapy. In the small ER-negative subpopulation chemo-endocrine therapy had a significantly better DFS than endocrine alone or no treatment. Despite small numbers of patients, "old-fashioned" treatments, and competing causes of treatment failure, the value of ER status as a target for response to adjuvant treatment is evident through prolonged follow-up.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)319-324
Number of pages6
JournalBreast Cancer Research and Treatment
Volume117
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Fingerprint

Estrogen Receptors
Breast Neoplasms
Recurrence
Therapeutics
Disease-Free Survival
Random Allocation
Treatment Failure
Drug Therapy

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Chemotherapy
  • Estrogen receptor
  • Hormonal therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Patterns of recurrence of early breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status : A therapeutic target for a quarter of a century. / Pagani, Olivia; Price, Karen N.; Gelber, Richard D.; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica; Holmberg, Stig B.; Lindtner, Jurij; Thürlimann, Beat; Collins, John; Fey, Martin F.; Coates, Alan S.; Goldhirsch, Aron.

In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, Vol. 117, No. 2, 09.2009, p. 319-324.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pagani, O, Price, KN, Gelber, RD, Castiglione-Gertsch, M, Holmberg, SB, Lindtner, J, Thürlimann, B, Collins, J, Fey, MF, Coates, AS & Goldhirsch, A 2009, 'Patterns of recurrence of early breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status: A therapeutic target for a quarter of a century', Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 117, no. 2, pp. 319-324. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-008-0282-0
Pagani, Olivia ; Price, Karen N. ; Gelber, Richard D. ; Castiglione-Gertsch, Monica ; Holmberg, Stig B. ; Lindtner, Jurij ; Thürlimann, Beat ; Collins, John ; Fey, Martin F. ; Coates, Alan S. ; Goldhirsch, Aron. / Patterns of recurrence of early breast cancer according to estrogen receptor status : A therapeutic target for a quarter of a century. In: Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. 2009 ; Vol. 117, No. 2. pp. 319-324.
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