Pediatric liver transplantation with cadaveric or living related donors: Comparative results in 90 elective recipients of primary grafts

Raymond Reding, Jean De Ville De Goyet, Isabelle Delbeke, Etienne Sokal, Jacques Jamart, Magda Janssen, Jean Bernard Otte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Study design: Between July 1993 and March 1997, 110 children were listed for primary elective liver transplantation with cadaveric (Cad: n = 68) or living-related (LR: n = 42) donors. Pregraft mortality, post-transplant survival, and surgical and immunologic complications were retrospectively compared in both groups. Results: The pregraft mortality rate was 10 (15%) of 68 versus 1 (2%) of 42 in the Cad and LR groups, respectively (P = .049). Postliver transplantation 1-year patient and graft survival rates were 87% and 75% in the Cad group (n = 49) versus 92% and 90% in the LR group (n = 41), respectively (NS). The incidence of post-transplant complications was as follows: hepatic artery thrombosis (Cad: 16%; LR: 0%, P = .020), portal vein thrombosis (Cad: 8%; LR: 2%, NS), and biliary complications (Cad: 14%; LR: 34%, P = .044). The overall incidence of acute rejection was similar in both groups; however, a lower incidence of acute rejection occurred in LR graft recipients treated with tacrolimus. Conclusions: The introduction of an LR donor liver transplantation program allowed a significant decrease in the pretransplant mortality rate, with a consequent overall improvement in patient survival compared with the Cad series. The incidence of biliary complications was higher in the LR series, whereas better human leukocyte antigen matching in this subgroup did not result in a lower rejection incidence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)280-286
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume134
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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