Percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty of pulmonary valve stenosis, dysplasia, and residual stenosis after surgical valvotomy for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum: Long-term results

L. Ballerini, C. E. Mullins, A. Cifarelli, L. Pasquini, G. De Simone, S. Giannico, P. Guccione, R. Di Donato, D. Di Carlo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Eighty-six children (aged 20 days to 14 years, 20 under age 1 year) underwent 94 percutaneous balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valve stenosis. The patients were divided into three groups: typical pulmonary valve stenosis (71), pulmonary valve dysplasia (9), and residual stenosis after surgical valvotomy for pulmonary atresia with intact ventricular septum (PAIS) (6). Each of the three groups was divided into two subgroups. In the early cases, balloon catheters with diameter 10-20% exceeding pulmonary valve annulus were used and the drop of the gradient was 39.5%. In the later cases, balloon diameters 30-40% greater than the valve anulus or double balloons were used and a drop of 66.7% in the RV-PA pressure gradient was achieved. The dilation in patients with dysplastic valve and residual stenosis after surgical valvotomy for PAIS was less effective. Doppler echocardiography was the technique used to evaluate residual gradient. Six months to 4 years follow-up demonstrated a persistent decrease of the valve gradient.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)165-169
Number of pages5
JournalCatheterization and Cardiovascular Diagnosis
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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