Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation

Serge Brand, Roumen Kirov, Nadeem Kalak, Markus Gerber, Uwe Pühse, Sakari Lemola, Christoph U. Correll, Samuele Cortese, Till Meyer, Edith Holsboer Trachsler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Perfectionism is understood as a set of personality traits such as unrealistically high and rigid standards for performance, fear of failure, and excessive self-criticism. Previous studies showed a direct association between increased perfectionism and poor sleep, though without taking into account possible mediating factors. Here, we tested the hypothesis that perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep, and that this association collapsed, if mediating factors such as stress and poor emotion regulation were taken into account. Methods: Three hundred and forty six young adult students (M=23.87 years) completed ques- tionnaires relating to perfectionism traits, sleep, and psychological functioning such as stress perception, coping with stress, emotion regulation, and mental toughness. Results: Perfectionism was directly associated with poor sleep and poor psychological func- tioning. When stress, poor coping, and poor emotion regulation were entered in the equation, perfectionism traits no longer contributed substantively to the explanation of poor sleep. Conclusion: Though perfectionism traits seem associated with poor sleep, the direct role of such traits seemed small, when mediating factors such as stress perception and emotion regula- tion were taken into account.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-271
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 3 2015

Keywords

  • Emotion regulation
  • Perceived stress
  • Perfectionism
  • Sleep quality
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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  • Cite this

    Brand, S., Kirov, R., Kalak, N., Gerber, M., Pühse, U., Lemola, S., Correll, C. U., Cortese, S., Meyer, T., & Trachsler, E. H. (2015). Perfectionism related to self-reported insomnia severity, but not when controlled for stress and emotion regulation. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 11, 263-271. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S74905