Perfusional and metabolic effects of nisoldipine as shown by positron emission tomography after acute myocardial infarction

Claudio Brunelli, Oberdan Parodi, Gianmario Sambuceti, Luca Corsiglia, Gian M. Rosa, Assuero Giorgetti, Gian P. Bezante, Nicola Nista, Salvatore Caponnetto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

After myocardial infarction, regional dysfunction can occur in viable myocardial regions because of the presence of baseline hypoperfusion. Recent evidence suggests that these areas may maintain a residual perfusion reserve. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether oral nisoldipine can increase regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) in dyssynergic but viable myocardium after myocardial infarction. Patients with isolated left anterior descending coronary stenosis were studied 1 month after the first myocardial infarction. Patients underwent [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose imaging, and MBF was measured, using positron emission tomography and [13N]ammonia, at baseline and following dobutamine administration (10 μg/kg/min over 5 minutes). MBF measurements were repeated 24 hours after nisoldipine (10 mg twice daily). Preliminary results suggest that necrotic areas showed the largest reduction in baseline MBF. Dyssynergicviable regions showed a reduced resting MBF but maintained a residual perfusion reserve in response to inotropic stimulation. Thus, nisoldipine selectively improved basal perfusion in dyssynergicviable myocardium.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe American Journal of Cardiology
Volume75
Issue number13 SUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 27 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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