Perinatal asphyxia in preterm neonates leads to serum changes in protein S-100 and neuron specific enolase

Distefano Giuseppe, Curreri Sergio, Betta Pasqua, Li Volti Giovanni, Cilauro Salvatore, Alessandro Frigiola, Huppi Petra, Amato Maurizio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In preterm infants, neurological signs and clinical manifestations of brain damage are limited criteria for diagnosis of neurologic sequelae. Early indicators of brain damage are needed and currently some specific biochemical markers of brain injury are investigated to assess regional brain damage after perinatal asphyxia in neonates. In this study Protein S-100 (PS-100) and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE) serum levels were studied serially during the perinatal period in preterm neonates with perinatal asphyxia as markers of glial and neuronal damage respectively. Thirty outborn preterm infants with perinatal asphyxia were studied at 3, 24, 48 hours and 7 days of life. According to Apgar scores at 1′ and cord blood pH and lacticidemia (LA), patients were divided in two groups: 15 of them (GA 33±1.2 wk, BW 1790±383 g) with severe asphyxia (Apgar

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-116
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Neurovascular Research
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

Keywords

  • Neuron specific enolase
  • Perinatal asphyxia
  • Protein S-100
  • Regional brain lesions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Perinatal asphyxia in preterm neonates leads to serum changes in protein S-100 and neuron specific enolase'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this