Perinatal transmission of HIV virus

Risk factors

C. Tibaldi, A. Bucceri, G. Perrini, G. Rossi, A. Ponti, R. D'Ambrosio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the role of different risk factors taking into account the effect of some potentially confounding variables. Methods: Data about maternal risk factors (clinical stage; CD4+ lymphocytes number, P24 antigenaemia, way of maternal infection, bleeding during pregnancy) and about events connected with delivery (gestational age, scalp, episiotomy) were collected from 519 mothers and 528 children born between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991. Infants were observed at least to the age of 18 months. The infection status of infants and mothers was assessed according to the CDC criteria. The CHI-SQUARE test was used for univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of the potentially confounding variables using the odds ratio as the association measure. Results: Mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children born after. As regards the way of delivery, children born by vaginal delivery or emergency Cesarean seem to be more frequently infected (20%) than those born by elective Cesarean (10.8%), but the result was not statistically significant but in multivariate analysis the probability of infection in children delivered by elective Cesarean was 3.25 (C.I. 0.70-15.20) times that of children delivered by emergency Cesarean or 3.23 (C.I. 1.15-9.06) times that of children delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children and that elective Cesarean section may have a protective effect, either compared with emergency Cesarean section or with vaginal delivery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)44-47
Number of pages4
JournalItalian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
Volume6
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

HIV
Viruses
Mothers
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Infection
Emergencies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Cesarean Section
Episiotomy
Lymphocyte Count
Risk-Taking
Scalp
Gestational Age
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Hemorrhage
Pregnancy

Keywords

  • Delivery
  • HIV-1 infection
  • Maternal risk factors
  • Pregnancy
  • Vertical transmission

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Cite this

Tibaldi, C., Bucceri, A., Perrini, G., Rossi, G., Ponti, A., & D'Ambrosio, R. (1994). Perinatal transmission of HIV virus: Risk factors. Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, 6(2), 44-47.

Perinatal transmission of HIV virus : Risk factors. / Tibaldi, C.; Bucceri, A.; Perrini, G.; Rossi, G.; Ponti, A.; D'Ambrosio, R.

In: Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1994, p. 44-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tibaldi, C, Bucceri, A, Perrini, G, Rossi, G, Ponti, A & D'Ambrosio, R 1994, 'Perinatal transmission of HIV virus: Risk factors', Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, vol. 6, no. 2, pp. 44-47.
Tibaldi C, Bucceri A, Perrini G, Rossi G, Ponti A, D'Ambrosio R. Perinatal transmission of HIV virus: Risk factors. Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 1994;6(2):44-47.
Tibaldi, C. ; Bucceri, A. ; Perrini, G. ; Rossi, G. ; Ponti, A. ; D'Ambrosio, R. / Perinatal transmission of HIV virus : Risk factors. In: Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 1994 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 44-47.
@article{6828a1f3e00744e897138148c125b5eb,
title = "Perinatal transmission of HIV virus: Risk factors",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate the role of different risk factors taking into account the effect of some potentially confounding variables. Methods: Data about maternal risk factors (clinical stage; CD4+ lymphocytes number, P24 antigenaemia, way of maternal infection, bleeding during pregnancy) and about events connected with delivery (gestational age, scalp, episiotomy) were collected from 519 mothers and 528 children born between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991. Infants were observed at least to the age of 18 months. The infection status of infants and mothers was assessed according to the CDC criteria. The CHI-SQUARE test was used for univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of the potentially confounding variables using the odds ratio as the association measure. Results: Mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children born after. As regards the way of delivery, children born by vaginal delivery or emergency Cesarean seem to be more frequently infected (20{\%}) than those born by elective Cesarean (10.8{\%}), but the result was not statistically significant but in multivariate analysis the probability of infection in children delivered by elective Cesarean was 3.25 (C.I. 0.70-15.20) times that of children delivered by emergency Cesarean or 3.23 (C.I. 1.15-9.06) times that of children delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children and that elective Cesarean section may have a protective effect, either compared with emergency Cesarean section or with vaginal delivery.",
keywords = "Delivery, HIV-1 infection, Maternal risk factors, Pregnancy, Vertical transmission",
author = "C. Tibaldi and A. Bucceri and G. Perrini and G. Rossi and A. Ponti and R. D'Ambrosio",
year = "1994",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "44--47",
journal = "Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics",
issn = "1121-8339",
publisher = "CIC Edizioni Internazionali s.r.l.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Perinatal transmission of HIV virus

T2 - Risk factors

AU - Tibaldi, C.

AU - Bucceri, A.

AU - Perrini, G.

AU - Rossi, G.

AU - Ponti, A.

AU - D'Ambrosio, R.

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Objective: To investigate the role of different risk factors taking into account the effect of some potentially confounding variables. Methods: Data about maternal risk factors (clinical stage; CD4+ lymphocytes number, P24 antigenaemia, way of maternal infection, bleeding during pregnancy) and about events connected with delivery (gestational age, scalp, episiotomy) were collected from 519 mothers and 528 children born between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991. Infants were observed at least to the age of 18 months. The infection status of infants and mothers was assessed according to the CDC criteria. The CHI-SQUARE test was used for univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of the potentially confounding variables using the odds ratio as the association measure. Results: Mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children born after. As regards the way of delivery, children born by vaginal delivery or emergency Cesarean seem to be more frequently infected (20%) than those born by elective Cesarean (10.8%), but the result was not statistically significant but in multivariate analysis the probability of infection in children delivered by elective Cesarean was 3.25 (C.I. 0.70-15.20) times that of children delivered by emergency Cesarean or 3.23 (C.I. 1.15-9.06) times that of children delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children and that elective Cesarean section may have a protective effect, either compared with emergency Cesarean section or with vaginal delivery.

AB - Objective: To investigate the role of different risk factors taking into account the effect of some potentially confounding variables. Methods: Data about maternal risk factors (clinical stage; CD4+ lymphocytes number, P24 antigenaemia, way of maternal infection, bleeding during pregnancy) and about events connected with delivery (gestational age, scalp, episiotomy) were collected from 519 mothers and 528 children born between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991. Infants were observed at least to the age of 18 months. The infection status of infants and mothers was assessed according to the CDC criteria. The CHI-SQUARE test was used for univariate analysis. Multiple logistic regression was performed to measure the effect of the potentially confounding variables using the odds ratio as the association measure. Results: Mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children born after. As regards the way of delivery, children born by vaginal delivery or emergency Cesarean seem to be more frequently infected (20%) than those born by elective Cesarean (10.8%), but the result was not statistically significant but in multivariate analysis the probability of infection in children delivered by elective Cesarean was 3.25 (C.I. 0.70-15.20) times that of children delivered by emergency Cesarean or 3.23 (C.I. 1.15-9.06) times that of children delivered vaginally. Conclusion: Our data suggest that mothers at IV CDC stage, with CD4+ counts below 500/mm3 and P24 antigenaemia were more at risk of transmitting infection to their children and that elective Cesarean section may have a protective effect, either compared with emergency Cesarean section or with vaginal delivery.

KW - Delivery

KW - HIV-1 infection

KW - Maternal risk factors

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Vertical transmission

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028586085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028586085&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 44

EP - 47

JO - Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics

JF - Italian Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics

SN - 1121-8339

IS - 2

ER -