Peripheral and central nervous system anomalies in HIV-1 infection: an electrophysiological study

F. Pinto, A. Grippo, P. Ghidini, F. Mazzotta, M. Di Pietro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explored the neurophysiological changes in 87 HIV1+ (20 AIDS, 24 ARC, 24 LAS and 19 AC) patients showing no clinical evidence of neurological impairment. Tracing somatosensory responses by recording SEPs from upper and lower limbs, we found a slowing of both peripheral and central nerve conduction. Peripheral alterations occurred in virtually all patients of the AIDS group. Central anomalies, confined largely to the lower spinal cord, manifested themselves only during the later stages of the disease (ARC and AIDS) and then only in about half of our sample. More marked neurotropic varieties of HIV1 may account for these differences. We feel that SEP studies can serve to reveal pre-clinical NS involvement in HIV1+ subjects and should be included among research strategies aimed at tracing the evolution of AIDS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-401
Number of pages9
JournalNeurophysiologie Clinique / Clinical Neurophysiology
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1992

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Nervous System Malformations
Peripheral Nervous System
HIV Infections
HIV-1
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Central Nervous System
AIDS-Related Complex
Neural Conduction
Peripheral Nerves
Lower Extremity
Spinal Cord
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Peripheral and central nervous system anomalies in HIV-1 infection : an electrophysiological study. / Pinto, F.; Grippo, A.; Ghidini, P.; Mazzotta, F.; Pietro, M. Di.

In: Neurophysiologie Clinique / Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 22, No. 5, 1992, p. 393-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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