Permanent intestinal failure

Olivier Goulet, Fabio Fusaro, Florence Lacaille, Frédérique Sauvat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context: Intestinal failure (IF) requires the use of parenteral nutrition as long as it persists and may be in case of persistence an indication for intestinal transplantation. Evidence acquisition: Literature search was performed both electronically and manually. Results and conclusions: Biological evaluation of IF is becoming possible with the use of plasma citrulline as a marker of intestinal mass. Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the leading cause of intestinal failure in infants while few epidemiological data are available to date. Data on morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with SBS are very limited while long-term outcome seems to be improving. Other causes of intestinal failure include neuro muscular intestinal disease and congenital disease of enterocyte development. The management of IF should include therapies adapted to each type and stage of IF based on a multidisciplinary approach, in centers involving pediatric surgery, pediatric gastroenterology, parenteral nutrition expertise, home- parenteral nutrition program, and liver-intestinal transplantation experience. Timing for referral of patients in specialized centers remains a crucial issue. The main causes of IF are briefly reviewed emphasizing the medico-surgical strategy for prevention and care-provision, adapted to each type and stage of IF.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)753-763
Number of pages11
JournalIndian Pediatrics
Volume45
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2008

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Keywords

  • Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction
  • Citrulline
  • Congenital enteropathy
  • Intestinal failure
  • Intestinal transplantation
  • Liver transplantation
  • Parenteral nutrition
  • Short bowel syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Goulet, O., Fusaro, F., Lacaille, F., & Sauvat, F. (2008). Permanent intestinal failure. Indian Pediatrics, 45(9), 753-763.