Personality factors predicting changes in shift work tolerance: A longitudinal study among nurses working rotating shifts

Ingvild Saksvik-Lehouillier, Bjørn Bjorvatn, Hilde Hetland, Gro Mjeldheim Sandal, Bente E. Moen, Nils Magerøy, Allison Harvey, Giovanni Costa, Ståle Pallesen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between personality factors (hardiness, morningness, flexibility, and languidity) and longitudinal changes on different measures of shift work tolerance (fatigue, sleepiness, anxiety and depression) over one year among nurses working rotating shifts. A total of 642 female Norwegian nurses working in a rotating three-shift schedule participated in the study. The cohort was established by age-stratified selection among members of the Norwegian Nurses Association in 2008. Questionnaires were administered in 2008/2009 (T1) and in 2009/2010 (T2). The results showed that hardiness was negatively related to fatigue, anxiety and depression at T2 when controlling for the scores on these constructs at T1. Morningness was not related to any indicators of shift work tolerance at T2 when controlling for shift work tolerance at T1. Flexibility was negatively related to anxiety at T2 when controlling for anxiety at T1. Languidity was positively related to sleepiness and fatigue at T2 when controlling for sleepiness and fatigue at T1. The findings indicate that personality factors, especially hardiness, can predict changes related to shift work tolerance over a period of one year.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-160
Number of pages18
JournalWork and Stress
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2012

Keywords

  • hardiness
  • longitudinal
  • nurses
  • personality
  • shift work tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Personality factors predicting changes in shift work tolerance: A longitudinal study among nurses working rotating shifts'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Saksvik-Lehouillier, I., Bjorvatn, B., Hetland, H., Sandal, G. M., Moen, B. E., Magerøy, N., Harvey, A., Costa, G., & Pallesen, S. (2012). Personality factors predicting changes in shift work tolerance: A longitudinal study among nurses working rotating shifts. Work and Stress, 26(2), 143-160. https://doi.org/10.1080/02678373.2012.686344