Pharmacoeconomic analysis of use of enteral nutrition in different clinical settings part 2: Use of supplemental feeding in elderly long-term hospitalized patients

Angelo C. Palozzo, Roberta Di Turi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Decision makers in health care settings in Italy are often concerned about the costs of nutritional intervention. In the economic simulation performed in this paper, it is demonstrated how simple nutritional supplementation is more cost-effective than other therapeutic interventions provided by the Italian National Health Service (i.e., in oncology). Methods: In a review of efficacy studies in long-term nutrition, a paper published by Larsson in 1990 provided the basis for the cost-effective analysis of the actual work. Four hundred and forty-one elderly patients received an additional 400 Kcal/day to the normal spontaneous oral diet, via oral nutritional supplements or enteral nutrition. Results: After 6 months from the start, a statistically significant drop in mortality (from 18.6% to 8.6%) was observed in the subgroup of well-nourished patients supplemented at hospital admission. On the assumption that 6-month survivors were surviving for at least 6 months, an incremental cost analysis was performed. The sensitivity analysis showed the range of costs for each life year saved to be between €1,133 and €13,200, based on the less expensive product vs. the most expensive.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-123
Number of pages5
JournalNutritional Therapy and Metabolism
Volume29
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Cost analysis
  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Dietary management
  • Elderly patients
  • Nutritional support
  • Quality-adjusted life years

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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