Pharmacological characterization of the interaction between aclidinium bromide and formoterol fumarate on human isolated bronchi

Mario Cazzola, Luigino Calzetta, Clive P. Page, Paola Rogliani, Francesco Facciolo, Amadeu Gavaldà, Maria Gabriella Matera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) and long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (LABAs) cause airway smooth muscle (ASM) relaxation via different signal transduction pathways, but there are limited data concerning the interaction between these two drug classes on human bronchi. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential synergistic interaction between aclidinium bromide and formoterol fumarate on the relaxation of human ASM. We evaluated the influence of aclidinium bromide and formoterol fumarate on the contractile response induced by acetylcholine or electrical field stimulation (EFS) on human isolated airways (segmental bronchi and bronchioles). We analyzed the potential synergistic interaction between the compounds when administered in combination by using Bliss independence (BI) theory. Both aclidinium bromide and formoterol fumarate completely relaxed segmental bronchi pre-contracted with acetylcholine (Emax: 97.5±2.6% and 96.4±1.1%; pEC50 8.5±0.1 and 8.8±0.1; respectively). Formoterol fumarate, but not aclidinium bromide, abolished the contraction induced by acetylcholine in bronchioles (Emax: 68.1±4.5% and 99.0±5.6%; pEC50 7.9±0.3 and 8.4±0.3; respectively). The BI analysis indicated synergistic interaction at low concentrations in segmental bronchi (+18.4±2.7%; P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-143
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Pharmacology
Volume745
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 15 2014

Keywords

  • COPD
  • Human bronchi
  • LABA
  • LAMA
  • Synergistic interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Medicine(all)

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