Pharmacological trials in migraine: It's time to reappraise where the headache is and what the pain is like

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Most pharmacological trials deal with migraine as if it were a clinically homogeneous disease, and when detailing its characteristics, they usually report only the presence, or absence, of aura and attack frequency but provide no information on pain location, a non-trivial clinical detail. The past decade has witnessed growing emerging evidence suggesting that individuals with unilateral pain, especially those with associated unilateral cranial autonomic symptoms, are more responsive than others to trigeminal-targeted symptomatic and preventive therapy with drugs such as triptans or botulinum toxin. A simple way for migraine research treatment to take a step forward might be to step back, reappraise, and critically evaluate easily obtainable patient-reported clinical findings along with current knowledge on pain features.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-441
Number of pages3
JournalHeadache
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 1 2015

Keywords

  • botulinum toxin
  • migraine
  • pain location
  • treatment
  • trigemino-autonomic reflex
  • unilateral cranial autonomic symptom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology
  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pharmacological trials in migraine: It's time to reappraise where the headache is and what the pain is like'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this