Phase II study of oral doxifluridine in elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

E. Baldini, C. Tibaldi, E. Pfanner, S. Ricci, A. Falcone, A. Ceribelli, R. Sarcina, G. Comella, C. Gallo Stampino, P. F. Conte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Elderly patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are usually excluded from most clinical trials because of the toxicity associated with chemotherapy. About 50% of the new cases of lung cancer occur in patients older than 65 years. Doxifluridine is a fluoropyrimidine derivate which can be administered orally with very low toxicities. This phase II study evaluates the toxicity and activity of a home therapy with oral doxifluridine in elderly advanced NSCLC patients. Thirty-three advanced NSCLC patients, aged 70 years or more, entered the study: median ECOG performance status was 1 (0-2) and 22 patients (66.6%) had metastatic disease. Doxifluridine was given orally in three divided doses, for a total daily dose of 2.250 mg, for 4 consecutive days every week. The treatment was well tolerated: five patients (15%) experienced a grade 3 diarrhea which required doxifluridine dose reduction to 1,500 mg daily. Thirty-one patients are evaluable for response: four partial responses (12.9%) have been observed (95% confidence limit interval 3.6-29.8%); 17 patients (54.8%) had a stabilization of the disease. This study demonstrates that a home therapy with oral doxifluridine in elderly NSCLC patients is feasible and well tolerated and should encourage further studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)592-594
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Keywords

  • Advanced non-small-cell lung cancer
  • Elderly patients
  • Oral doxifluridine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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