Physical activity, socialization and reading in the elderly over the age of seventy: What is the relation with cognitive decline? Evidence from "The Treviso Longeva (TRELONG) study"

M. Gallucci, P. Antuono, F. Ongaro, P. L. Forloni, D. Albani, G. P. Amici, C. Regini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Evidence in the literature suggests that physical activity, social contacts and cognitively stimulating activity, such as reading, often considered individually, may improve cognitive performance. Our work examines their interactions and confirms their positive effects on cognitive functions. The correlations between physical activity, socialization, reading and improved cognitive performance remained significant after adjusting for confounding factors, such as comorbidity and hearing function. Our work suggests that these factors are important for the prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-286
Number of pages3
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume48
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

Fingerprint

Socialization
socialization
Reading
Exercise
Cognition
Hearing
evidence
Comorbidity
social relations
comorbidity
performance
interaction
Cognitive Dysfunction

Keywords

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Physical activity
  • Reading habits in elderly
  • Socialization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology

Cite this

Physical activity, socialization and reading in the elderly over the age of seventy : What is the relation with cognitive decline? Evidence from "The Treviso Longeva (TRELONG) study". / Gallucci, M.; Antuono, P.; Ongaro, F.; Forloni, P. L.; Albani, D.; Amici, G. P.; Regini, C.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 48, No. 3, 05.2009, p. 284-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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