Physical performance measures and polypharmacy among hospitalized older adults: Results from the crime study

F. Sganga, D. L. Vetrano, S. Volpato, A. Cherubini, C. Ruggiero, A. Corsonello, P. Fabbietti, F. Lattanzio, R. Bernabei, G. Onder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the association of polypharmacy and physical performance measures in a sample of elderly patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute care hospitals. Design, setting and participants: Prospective study conducted among 1123 hospitalized older adults participating to the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) project. Measurements: Physical performance was measured at hospital admission by the 4-meter walking speed (WS) and the grip strength (GS). Polypharmacy was defined as the use of ≥10 drugs during hospital stay. Results: Mean age of 1123 participants was 81.5±7.4 years and 576 (51.3%) were on polypharmacy. Prevalence of polypharmacy was higher in patients with low WS and GS. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of WS were less likely to be on polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.96). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile of GS had a significantly lower likelihood of polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36-0.84). When examined as continuous variables, WS and GS were inversely associated with polypharmacy (WS: OR 0.77 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.60-0.98; GS: OR 0.71 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.56-0.90). Conclusion: Among hospitalized older adults WS and GS are inversely related to polypharmacy. These measures should be incorporated in standard assessment of in-hospital patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)616-621
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Polypharmacy
Crime
Hand Strength
Walking Speed
Length of Stay
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Elderly
  • Grip strength
  • Physical parameters
  • Polypharmacy
  • Walking speed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Physical performance measures and polypharmacy among hospitalized older adults : Results from the crime study. / Sganga, F.; Vetrano, D. L.; Volpato, S.; Cherubini, A.; Ruggiero, C.; Corsonello, A.; Fabbietti, P.; Lattanzio, F.; Bernabei, R.; Onder, G.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, Vol. 18, No. 6, 2014, p. 616-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{7c712b69b3674ee6af39b4b85d5b3ab1,
title = "Physical performance measures and polypharmacy among hospitalized older adults: Results from the crime study",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate the association of polypharmacy and physical performance measures in a sample of elderly patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute care hospitals. Design, setting and participants: Prospective study conducted among 1123 hospitalized older adults participating to the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) project. Measurements: Physical performance was measured at hospital admission by the 4-meter walking speed (WS) and the grip strength (GS). Polypharmacy was defined as the use of ≥10 drugs during hospital stay. Results: Mean age of 1123 participants was 81.5±7.4 years and 576 (51.3{\%}) were on polypharmacy. Prevalence of polypharmacy was higher in patients with low WS and GS. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of WS were less likely to be on polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.58; 95{\%} CI 0.35-0.96). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile of GS had a significantly lower likelihood of polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.55; 95{\%} CI 0.36-0.84). When examined as continuous variables, WS and GS were inversely associated with polypharmacy (WS: OR 0.77 per 1 SD increment; 95{\%} CI 0.60-0.98; GS: OR 0.71 per 1 SD increment; 95{\%} CI 0.56-0.90). Conclusion: Among hospitalized older adults WS and GS are inversely related to polypharmacy. These measures should be incorporated in standard assessment of in-hospital patients.",
keywords = "Elderly, Grip strength, Physical parameters, Polypharmacy, Walking speed",
author = "F. Sganga and Vetrano, {D. L.} and S. Volpato and A. Cherubini and C. Ruggiero and A. Corsonello and P. Fabbietti and F. Lattanzio and R. Bernabei and G. Onder",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1007/s12603-014-0029-z",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "616--621",
journal = "Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging",
issn = "1279-7707",
publisher = "Springer Paris",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical performance measures and polypharmacy among hospitalized older adults

T2 - Results from the crime study

AU - Sganga, F.

AU - Vetrano, D. L.

AU - Volpato, S.

AU - Cherubini, A.

AU - Ruggiero, C.

AU - Corsonello, A.

AU - Fabbietti, P.

AU - Lattanzio, F.

AU - Bernabei, R.

AU - Onder, G.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Objective: To investigate the association of polypharmacy and physical performance measures in a sample of elderly patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute care hospitals. Design, setting and participants: Prospective study conducted among 1123 hospitalized older adults participating to the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) project. Measurements: Physical performance was measured at hospital admission by the 4-meter walking speed (WS) and the grip strength (GS). Polypharmacy was defined as the use of ≥10 drugs during hospital stay. Results: Mean age of 1123 participants was 81.5±7.4 years and 576 (51.3%) were on polypharmacy. Prevalence of polypharmacy was higher in patients with low WS and GS. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of WS were less likely to be on polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.96). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile of GS had a significantly lower likelihood of polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36-0.84). When examined as continuous variables, WS and GS were inversely associated with polypharmacy (WS: OR 0.77 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.60-0.98; GS: OR 0.71 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.56-0.90). Conclusion: Among hospitalized older adults WS and GS are inversely related to polypharmacy. These measures should be incorporated in standard assessment of in-hospital patients.

AB - Objective: To investigate the association of polypharmacy and physical performance measures in a sample of elderly patients aged ≥65 years admitted to acute care hospitals. Design, setting and participants: Prospective study conducted among 1123 hospitalized older adults participating to the CRiteria to Assess Appropriate Medication Use among Elderly Complex Patients (CRIME) project. Measurements: Physical performance was measured at hospital admission by the 4-meter walking speed (WS) and the grip strength (GS). Polypharmacy was defined as the use of ≥10 drugs during hospital stay. Results: Mean age of 1123 participants was 81.5±7.4 years and 576 (51.3%) were on polypharmacy. Prevalence of polypharmacy was higher in patients with low WS and GS. After adjusting for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of WS were less likely to be on polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35-0.96). Similarly, participants in the highest tertile of GS had a significantly lower likelihood of polypharmacy as compared with those in the lowest tertile (OR 0.55; 95% CI 0.36-0.84). When examined as continuous variables, WS and GS were inversely associated with polypharmacy (WS: OR 0.77 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.60-0.98; GS: OR 0.71 per 1 SD increment; 95% CI 0.56-0.90). Conclusion: Among hospitalized older adults WS and GS are inversely related to polypharmacy. These measures should be incorporated in standard assessment of in-hospital patients.

KW - Elderly

KW - Grip strength

KW - Physical parameters

KW - Polypharmacy

KW - Walking speed

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905674708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905674708&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12603-014-0029-z

DO - 10.1007/s12603-014-0029-z

M3 - Article

C2 - 24950153

AN - SCOPUS:84905674708

VL - 18

SP - 616

EP - 621

JO - Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging

JF - Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging

SN - 1279-7707

IS - 6

ER -