Physician-Delivered Advice to Quit Smoking Among Italian Smokers

Amy K. Ferketich, Silvano Gallus, Paolo Colombo, Roldano Fossati, Giovanni Apolone, Piergiorgio Zuccaro, Carlo La Vecchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: A clinical practice guideline for smoking cessation was released in Italy in 2002, but to date little is known about the implementation of these recommendations among primary care physicians. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of receiving physician-delivered advice to quit smoking and to determine what factors were related to the receipt of advice among adult Italian smokers. Methods: The data were collected as part of the Italian 2004-2006 adult tobacco surveys (analyzed in 2007), conducted by DOXA, the Italian branch of the Gallup International Association, and representative of the population aged ≥18 years. Each year smokers were asked whether they had received advice to quit smoking from their family physician during the previous year. Demographic, socioeconomic, tobacco-related, and physician-related variables were examined for their association with the receipt of advice. A logistic regression model was then fit to the data to determine which variables were related to receiving advice to quit smoking. Results: Overall, 22% of smokers reported receiving advice to quit smoking from their physician in the previous year. Less likely to receive advice to quit were smokers who: were single (compared to divorced, widowed, or separated); lived in the South; had a higher level of education; were lighter smokers; had no previous quit attempts; and had physicians who likely smoked. Conclusions: The data suggest that Italian physicians are not advising smokers to quit at a high rate. Future research should focus on methods that encourage physicians to counsel smokers to quit during a patient-provider encounter.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)60-63
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2008

Fingerprint

Smoking
Physicians
Tobacco
Logistic Models
Widowhood
Divorce
Family Physicians
Primary Care Physicians
Smoking Cessation
Practice Guidelines
Italy
Demography
Education
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Physician-Delivered Advice to Quit Smoking Among Italian Smokers. / Ferketich, Amy K.; Gallus, Silvano; Colombo, Paolo; Fossati, Roldano; Apolone, Giovanni; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; La Vecchia, Carlo.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 35, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 60-63.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ferketich, Amy K. ; Gallus, Silvano ; Colombo, Paolo ; Fossati, Roldano ; Apolone, Giovanni ; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio ; La Vecchia, Carlo. / Physician-Delivered Advice to Quit Smoking Among Italian Smokers. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 60-63.
@article{d644a38b0226461d9a758553971d2207,
title = "Physician-Delivered Advice to Quit Smoking Among Italian Smokers",
abstract = "Objective: A clinical practice guideline for smoking cessation was released in Italy in 2002, but to date little is known about the implementation of these recommendations among primary care physicians. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of receiving physician-delivered advice to quit smoking and to determine what factors were related to the receipt of advice among adult Italian smokers. Methods: The data were collected as part of the Italian 2004-2006 adult tobacco surveys (analyzed in 2007), conducted by DOXA, the Italian branch of the Gallup International Association, and representative of the population aged ≥18 years. Each year smokers were asked whether they had received advice to quit smoking from their family physician during the previous year. Demographic, socioeconomic, tobacco-related, and physician-related variables were examined for their association with the receipt of advice. A logistic regression model was then fit to the data to determine which variables were related to receiving advice to quit smoking. Results: Overall, 22{\%} of smokers reported receiving advice to quit smoking from their physician in the previous year. Less likely to receive advice to quit were smokers who: were single (compared to divorced, widowed, or separated); lived in the South; had a higher level of education; were lighter smokers; had no previous quit attempts; and had physicians who likely smoked. Conclusions: The data suggest that Italian physicians are not advising smokers to quit at a high rate. Future research should focus on methods that encourage physicians to counsel smokers to quit during a patient-provider encounter.",
author = "Ferketich, {Amy K.} and Silvano Gallus and Paolo Colombo and Roldano Fossati and Giovanni Apolone and Piergiorgio Zuccaro and {La Vecchia}, Carlo",
year = "2008",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.amepre.2008.03.022",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "60--63",
journal = "American Journal of Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0749-3797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physician-Delivered Advice to Quit Smoking Among Italian Smokers

AU - Ferketich, Amy K.

AU - Gallus, Silvano

AU - Colombo, Paolo

AU - Fossati, Roldano

AU - Apolone, Giovanni

AU - Zuccaro, Piergiorgio

AU - La Vecchia, Carlo

PY - 2008/7

Y1 - 2008/7

N2 - Objective: A clinical practice guideline for smoking cessation was released in Italy in 2002, but to date little is known about the implementation of these recommendations among primary care physicians. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of receiving physician-delivered advice to quit smoking and to determine what factors were related to the receipt of advice among adult Italian smokers. Methods: The data were collected as part of the Italian 2004-2006 adult tobacco surveys (analyzed in 2007), conducted by DOXA, the Italian branch of the Gallup International Association, and representative of the population aged ≥18 years. Each year smokers were asked whether they had received advice to quit smoking from their family physician during the previous year. Demographic, socioeconomic, tobacco-related, and physician-related variables were examined for their association with the receipt of advice. A logistic regression model was then fit to the data to determine which variables were related to receiving advice to quit smoking. Results: Overall, 22% of smokers reported receiving advice to quit smoking from their physician in the previous year. Less likely to receive advice to quit were smokers who: were single (compared to divorced, widowed, or separated); lived in the South; had a higher level of education; were lighter smokers; had no previous quit attempts; and had physicians who likely smoked. Conclusions: The data suggest that Italian physicians are not advising smokers to quit at a high rate. Future research should focus on methods that encourage physicians to counsel smokers to quit during a patient-provider encounter.

AB - Objective: A clinical practice guideline for smoking cessation was released in Italy in 2002, but to date little is known about the implementation of these recommendations among primary care physicians. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of receiving physician-delivered advice to quit smoking and to determine what factors were related to the receipt of advice among adult Italian smokers. Methods: The data were collected as part of the Italian 2004-2006 adult tobacco surveys (analyzed in 2007), conducted by DOXA, the Italian branch of the Gallup International Association, and representative of the population aged ≥18 years. Each year smokers were asked whether they had received advice to quit smoking from their family physician during the previous year. Demographic, socioeconomic, tobacco-related, and physician-related variables were examined for their association with the receipt of advice. A logistic regression model was then fit to the data to determine which variables were related to receiving advice to quit smoking. Results: Overall, 22% of smokers reported receiving advice to quit smoking from their physician in the previous year. Less likely to receive advice to quit were smokers who: were single (compared to divorced, widowed, or separated); lived in the South; had a higher level of education; were lighter smokers; had no previous quit attempts; and had physicians who likely smoked. Conclusions: The data suggest that Italian physicians are not advising smokers to quit at a high rate. Future research should focus on methods that encourage physicians to counsel smokers to quit during a patient-provider encounter.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=44649146443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=44649146443&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.03.022

DO - 10.1016/j.amepre.2008.03.022

M3 - Article

C2 - 18482820

AN - SCOPUS:44649146443

VL - 35

SP - 60

EP - 63

JO - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

JF - American Journal of Preventive Medicine

SN - 0749-3797

IS - 1

ER -