Physiopathological determinants of human infertility

D. T. Baird, G. Benagiano, J. Cohen, J. Collins, L. H. Evers, L. Fraser, H. Jacobs, I. Liebaers, B. Tarlatzis, A. Templeton, A. Van Steirteghem, P. G. Crosignani, E. Diczfalusy, K. Diedrich, G. C. Frigerio, L. Gianaroli, A. Glasier, J. Persson, J. P. Quartarolo, G. Ragni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Successful management of infertility involves the use of appropriate diagnostic tests and treatments, and knowledge of prognostic factors such as age of the female partner and duration of infertility. The assessment of infertility may reveal disorders that cause morbidity in the normally fertile population, which might or might not contribute to the infertility. Endocrine dysfunction is a significant cause of infertility due to amenorrhoea and dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and hirsutism is a familiar problem in the normal population. Some genetic abnormalities cause infertility in males and females and create implications for the progeny of infertile couples. Sexually transmitted diseases cause illness and healthcare expenditure among young adults, and can also result in tubal infertility. Congenital disorders of the uterus and fibromyomas are not rare and they are frequently asymptomatic, but in some cases uterine anomalies may contribute to infertility and pregnancy loss. Autoimmunity underlies some common diseases, especially among females, and it can also be associated with pregnancy loss. When such widely distributed factors are identified during the diagnostic assessment of subfertile couples, it is important to distinguish between a coincidental association and a specific relationship to the infertility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)435-447
Number of pages13
JournalHuman Reproduction Update
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Infertility
Female Infertility
Pregnancy
Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities
Hirsutism
Metrorrhagia
Male Infertility
Amenorrhea
Leiomyoma
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Health Expenditures
Autoimmunity
Routine Diagnostic Tests
Population
Uterus
Young Adult
Morbidity
Delivery of Health Care

Keywords

  • Anovulation
  • Assisted procreation
  • Genetic abnormalities
  • Infertility
  • Sexually transmitted disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynaecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

Baird, D. T., Benagiano, G., Cohen, J., Collins, J., Evers, L. H., Fraser, L., ... Ragni, G. (2002). Physiopathological determinants of human infertility. Human Reproduction Update, 8(5), 435-447. https://doi.org/10.1093/humupd/8.5.435

Physiopathological determinants of human infertility. / Baird, D. T.; Benagiano, G.; Cohen, J.; Collins, J.; Evers, L. H.; Fraser, L.; Jacobs, H.; Liebaers, I.; Tarlatzis, B.; Templeton, A.; Van Steirteghem, A.; Crosignani, P. G.; Diczfalusy, E.; Diedrich, K.; Frigerio, G. C.; Gianaroli, L.; Glasier, A.; Persson, J.; Quartarolo, J. P.; Ragni, G.

In: Human Reproduction Update, Vol. 8, No. 5, 09.2002, p. 435-447.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baird, DT, Benagiano, G, Cohen, J, Collins, J, Evers, LH, Fraser, L, Jacobs, H, Liebaers, I, Tarlatzis, B, Templeton, A, Van Steirteghem, A, Crosignani, PG, Diczfalusy, E, Diedrich, K, Frigerio, GC, Gianaroli, L, Glasier, A, Persson, J, Quartarolo, JP & Ragni, G 2002, 'Physiopathological determinants of human infertility', Human Reproduction Update, vol. 8, no. 5, pp. 435-447. https://doi.org/10.1093/humupd/8.5.435
Baird DT, Benagiano G, Cohen J, Collins J, Evers LH, Fraser L et al. Physiopathological determinants of human infertility. Human Reproduction Update. 2002 Sep;8(5):435-447. https://doi.org/10.1093/humupd/8.5.435
Baird, D. T. ; Benagiano, G. ; Cohen, J. ; Collins, J. ; Evers, L. H. ; Fraser, L. ; Jacobs, H. ; Liebaers, I. ; Tarlatzis, B. ; Templeton, A. ; Van Steirteghem, A. ; Crosignani, P. G. ; Diczfalusy, E. ; Diedrich, K. ; Frigerio, G. C. ; Gianaroli, L. ; Glasier, A. ; Persson, J. ; Quartarolo, J. P. ; Ragni, G. / Physiopathological determinants of human infertility. In: Human Reproduction Update. 2002 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 435-447.
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