Pneumococcal bacterial load colonization as a marker of mixed infection in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia and respiratory syncytial virus or rhinovirus infection

Susanna Esposito, Alberto Zampiero, Leonardo Terranova, Valentina Ierardi, Beatrice Ascolese, Cristina Daleno, Elisabetta Prada, Claudio Pelucchi, Nicola Principi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The main aim of this study was to evaluate whether nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children with alveolar community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or rhinovirus (RV) infection indicates a mixed lung infection. METHODS: The nasopharyngeal secretions of 530 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were tested using the Luminex x TAG respiratory virus panel fast assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction for the autolysin-A (LytA) and wzg (cpsA) genes of S. pneumoniae was performed on the RSV- and RV-positive samples. RESULTS: Sixty-five of the 126 RSV-positive children (51.6%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae. Mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.54 ± 1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.75 ± 1.62 log10 DNA copies/mL; P = 0.04). Serotypes 5 and 19A were almost exclusively identified in the children with RSV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 19A (P = 0.03). Eighty-three of the 134 RV-positive children (61.9%) were colonized with S. pneumoniae and again mean bacterial load was significantly higher in the patients with alveolar involvement (4.21 ± 1.37 log10 DNA copies/mL vs. 3.41 ± 1.47 log10 DNA copies/mL; P = 0.03). Serotypes 1, 5 and 19A were more frequently identified in the children with RV and alveolar CAP, although the difference was statistically significant only for serotype 5 (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: In children with alveolar CAP and RSV or RV infection, the determination of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal bacterial load and identification of the serotypes can contribute to the diagnosis of mixed lung infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1199-1204
Number of pages6
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume32
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • community-acquired pneumonia
  • respiratory syncytial virus
  • respiratory viruses
  • rhinovirus
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

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