Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients

Antonio Amoroso, Giorgia Danek, Serena Vatta, Sergio Crovella, Monica Berrino, Simonetta Guarrera, Maria Edvige Fasano, Gina Mazzola, Alessandro Amore, Bruno Gianoglio, Licia Peruzzi, Rosanna Coppo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on the progression of primary IEA nephropathy (pIgAN) is still debated. Even though the allele frequency was reported to be similar to controls, in some studies D/D patients had a faster decline of renal function and need of dialysis. Since Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) nephritis is considered a systemic vasculitis with renal lesions indistinguishable from pIgAN, we investigated the effect of the ACE polymorphism on presentation and progression of HSP IgAN. Methods. We examined the insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene by PCR amplification of genomic DNA of 82 patients (37 children), with biopsy-proven IgAN associated with HSP enrolled in a collaborative study. Results. No significant association with clinical presentation at onset or with final outcome was found (functional impairment at outcome in 31.8% D/D, 27.4% I/D and 44% I/I, heavy proteinuria in 36.3% D/D, 21.6% I/D, and 11.1% I/I). Patients homozygous for the D allele had a greater number of extrarenal relapses (P = 0.0028). No association was found between the ACE genotype and the presence of hypertension at onset and at the end of the follow-up. No difference was found between adults and children. Conclusions. In this cohort of HSP IgAN, no ACE I/D polymorphisms were found to be associated with progressive deterioration of renal function. Different genes possibly involved in vasculitis might more strictly modulate expression and evolution of HSP IgAN.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3184-3188
Number of pages5
JournalNephrology Dialysis Transplantation
Volume13
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1998

Fingerprint

Schoenlein-Henoch Purpura
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Kidney
Genes
Systemic Vasculitis
Nephritis
Gene Amplification
Vasculitis
Proteinuria
Gene Frequency
Introns
Dialysis
Alleles
Genotype
Hypertension
Biopsy
Recurrence
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA

Keywords

  • ACE
  • DNA polymorphism
  • Henoch-Schoenlein purpura
  • PCR

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Amoroso, A., Danek, G., Vatta, S., Crovella, S., Berrino, M., Guarrera, S., ... Coppo, R. (1998). Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 13(12), 3184-3188.

Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients. / Amoroso, Antonio; Danek, Giorgia; Vatta, Serena; Crovella, Sergio; Berrino, Monica; Guarrera, Simonetta; Fasano, Maria Edvige; Mazzola, Gina; Amore, Alessandro; Gianoglio, Bruno; Peruzzi, Licia; Coppo, Rosanna.

In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, Vol. 13, No. 12, 12.1998, p. 3184-3188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Amoroso, A, Danek, G, Vatta, S, Crovella, S, Berrino, M, Guarrera, S, Fasano, ME, Mazzola, G, Amore, A, Gianoglio, B, Peruzzi, L & Coppo, R 1998, 'Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients', Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, vol. 13, no. 12, pp. 3184-3188.
Amoroso, Antonio ; Danek, Giorgia ; Vatta, Serena ; Crovella, Sergio ; Berrino, Monica ; Guarrera, Simonetta ; Fasano, Maria Edvige ; Mazzola, Gina ; Amore, Alessandro ; Gianoglio, Bruno ; Peruzzi, Licia ; Coppo, Rosanna. / Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients. In: Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation. 1998 ; Vol. 13, No. 12. pp. 3184-3188.
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title = "Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients",
abstract = "Background. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on the progression of primary IEA nephropathy (pIgAN) is still debated. Even though the allele frequency was reported to be similar to controls, in some studies D/D patients had a faster decline of renal function and need of dialysis. Since Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) nephritis is considered a systemic vasculitis with renal lesions indistinguishable from pIgAN, we investigated the effect of the ACE polymorphism on presentation and progression of HSP IgAN. Methods. We examined the insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene by PCR amplification of genomic DNA of 82 patients (37 children), with biopsy-proven IgAN associated with HSP enrolled in a collaborative study. Results. No significant association with clinical presentation at onset or with final outcome was found (functional impairment at outcome in 31.8{\%} D/D, 27.4{\%} I/D and 44{\%} I/I, heavy proteinuria in 36.3{\%} D/D, 21.6{\%} I/D, and 11.1{\%} I/I). Patients homozygous for the D allele had a greater number of extrarenal relapses (P = 0.0028). No association was found between the ACE genotype and the presence of hypertension at onset and at the end of the follow-up. No difference was found between adults and children. Conclusions. In this cohort of HSP IgAN, no ACE I/D polymorphisms were found to be associated with progressive deterioration of renal function. Different genes possibly involved in vasculitis might more strictly modulate expression and evolution of HSP IgAN.",
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T1 - Polymorphisms in angiotensin-converting enzyme gene and severity of renal disease in Henoch-Schoenlein patients

AU - Amoroso, Antonio

AU - Danek, Giorgia

AU - Vatta, Serena

AU - Crovella, Sergio

AU - Berrino, Monica

AU - Guarrera, Simonetta

AU - Fasano, Maria Edvige

AU - Mazzola, Gina

AU - Amore, Alessandro

AU - Gianoglio, Bruno

AU - Peruzzi, Licia

AU - Coppo, Rosanna

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N2 - Background. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on the progression of primary IEA nephropathy (pIgAN) is still debated. Even though the allele frequency was reported to be similar to controls, in some studies D/D patients had a faster decline of renal function and need of dialysis. Since Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) nephritis is considered a systemic vasculitis with renal lesions indistinguishable from pIgAN, we investigated the effect of the ACE polymorphism on presentation and progression of HSP IgAN. Methods. We examined the insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene by PCR amplification of genomic DNA of 82 patients (37 children), with biopsy-proven IgAN associated with HSP enrolled in a collaborative study. Results. No significant association with clinical presentation at onset or with final outcome was found (functional impairment at outcome in 31.8% D/D, 27.4% I/D and 44% I/I, heavy proteinuria in 36.3% D/D, 21.6% I/D, and 11.1% I/I). Patients homozygous for the D allele had a greater number of extrarenal relapses (P = 0.0028). No association was found between the ACE genotype and the presence of hypertension at onset and at the end of the follow-up. No difference was found between adults and children. Conclusions. In this cohort of HSP IgAN, no ACE I/D polymorphisms were found to be associated with progressive deterioration of renal function. Different genes possibly involved in vasculitis might more strictly modulate expression and evolution of HSP IgAN.

AB - Background. The influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphism on the progression of primary IEA nephropathy (pIgAN) is still debated. Even though the allele frequency was reported to be similar to controls, in some studies D/D patients had a faster decline of renal function and need of dialysis. Since Henoch-Schoenlein purpura (HSP) nephritis is considered a systemic vasculitis with renal lesions indistinguishable from pIgAN, we investigated the effect of the ACE polymorphism on presentation and progression of HSP IgAN. Methods. We examined the insertion (I) and deletion (D) polymorphism in intron 16 of ACE gene by PCR amplification of genomic DNA of 82 patients (37 children), with biopsy-proven IgAN associated with HSP enrolled in a collaborative study. Results. No significant association with clinical presentation at onset or with final outcome was found (functional impairment at outcome in 31.8% D/D, 27.4% I/D and 44% I/I, heavy proteinuria in 36.3% D/D, 21.6% I/D, and 11.1% I/I). Patients homozygous for the D allele had a greater number of extrarenal relapses (P = 0.0028). No association was found between the ACE genotype and the presence of hypertension at onset and at the end of the follow-up. No difference was found between adults and children. Conclusions. In this cohort of HSP IgAN, no ACE I/D polymorphisms were found to be associated with progressive deterioration of renal function. Different genes possibly involved in vasculitis might more strictly modulate expression and evolution of HSP IgAN.

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