Polymorphisms in DNA repair genes: Link with biomarkers of the CBMN cytome assay in hospital workers chronically exposed to low doses of ionising radiation

Mirta Milić, Ružica Rozgaj, Vilena Kašuba, Ana Marija Jazbec, Boris Starčević, Barnaba Lyzbicki, Gloria Ravegnini, Corrado Zenesini, Muriel Musti, Patrizia Hrelia, Sabrina Angelini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Individual sensitivity to ionising radiation (IR) is the result of interaction between exposure, DNA damage, and its repair, which is why polymorphisms in DNA repair genes could play an important role. We examined the association between DNA damage, expressed as micronuclei (MNi), nuclear buds (NBs), and nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) and single nucleotide polymorphisms in selected DNA repair genes (APE1, hOGG1, XRCC1, XRCC3, XPD, PARP1, MGMT genes; representative of the different DNA repair pathways operating in mammals) in 77 hospital workers chronically exposed to low doses of IR, and 70 matched controls. A significantly higher MNi frequency was found in the exposed group (16.2±10.4 vs. 11.5±9.4; P=0.003) and the effect appeared to be independent from the principal confounding factor. Exposed individuals with hOGG1, XRCC1, PARP1, and MGMT wild-type alleles or APEX1, as well as XPD (rs13181) heterozygous showed a significantly higher MNi frequency than controls with the same genotypes. Genetic polymorphism analysis and cytogenetic dosimetry have proven to be a powerful tool complementary to physical dosimetry in regular health surveillance programmes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)109-120
Number of pages12
JournalArhiv za Higijenu Rada i Toksikologiju
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2015

Keywords

  • genotype analysis
  • micronucleus
  • nuclear bud
  • nucleoplasmic bridge
  • occupational exposure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Toxicology

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