Polypharmacy and mortality among nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment: Results from the shelter study

Graziano Onder, Rosa Liperoti, Andrea Foebel, Daniela Fialova, Eva Topinkova, Henriëtte G. Van der Roest, Jacob Gindin, Alfonso J. Cruz-Jentoft, Massimo Fini, Giovanni Gambassi, Roberto Bernabei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Older adults with advanced cognitive impairment have a limited life expectancy and the use of multiple drugs is of questionable benefit in this population. The aim of the present study was to assess if, in a sample of nursing home (NH) residents with advanced cognitive impairment, the effect of polypharmacy on mortality differs depending on estimated life expectancy. Methods: Data were from the Services and Health for Elderly in Long TERm care (SHELTER) project, a study collecting information on residents admitted to 57 NHs in 8 European countries. Polypharmacy was defined as the concomitant use of 10 or more drugs. Limited life expectancy was estimated based on an Advanced Dementia Prognostic Tool (ADEPT) score of 13.5 or more. A Cognitive Performance Scale score of 5 or more was used to define advanced cognitive impairment. Participants were followed for 1 year. Results: Mean age of 822 residents with advanced cognitive impairment entering the study was 84.6 (SD 8.0) years, and 630 (86.6%) were women. Overall, 123 participants (15.0%) had an ADEPT score of 13.5 or more (indicating limited life expectancy) and 114 (13.9%) were on polypharmacy. Relative to residents with ADEPT score less than 13.5, those with ADEPT score of 13.5 or higher had a lower use of benzodiazepines, antidementia drugs, and statins but a higher use of beta-blockers, digoxin, and antibiotics. Polypharmacy was associated with increased mortality among residents with ADEPT score of 13.5 or more (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.19, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.15-4.17), but not among those with ADEPT score less than 13.5 (adjusted HR 1.10, 95% CI: 0.71-1.71). Discussion: Polypharmacy is associated with increased mortality in NH residents with advanced cognitive impairment at the end of life. Conclusion: These findings underline the need to assess life expectancy in older adults to improve the prescribing process and to simplify drug regimens.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume14
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

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Polypharmacy
Nursing Homes
Dementia
Life Expectancy
Mortality
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Health Services for the Aged
Confidence Intervals
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Digoxin
Benzodiazepines
Cognitive Dysfunction
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Population

Keywords

  • Advanced cognitive impairment
  • End of life
  • Polypharmacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Polypharmacy and mortality among nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment : Results from the shelter study. / Onder, Graziano; Liperoti, Rosa; Foebel, Andrea; Fialova, Daniela; Topinkova, Eva; Van der Roest, Henriëtte G.; Gindin, Jacob; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J.; Fini, Massimo; Gambassi, Giovanni; Bernabei, Roberto.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 14, No. 6, 06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Onder, G, Liperoti, R, Foebel, A, Fialova, D, Topinkova, E, Van der Roest, HG, Gindin, J, Cruz-Jentoft, AJ, Fini, M, Gambassi, G & Bernabei, R 2013, 'Polypharmacy and mortality among nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment: Results from the shelter study', Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, vol. 14, no. 6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2013.03.014
Onder, Graziano ; Liperoti, Rosa ; Foebel, Andrea ; Fialova, Daniela ; Topinkova, Eva ; Van der Roest, Henriëtte G. ; Gindin, Jacob ; Cruz-Jentoft, Alfonso J. ; Fini, Massimo ; Gambassi, Giovanni ; Bernabei, Roberto. / Polypharmacy and mortality among nursing home residents with advanced cognitive impairment : Results from the shelter study. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2013 ; Vol. 14, No. 6.
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AU - Topinkova, Eva

AU - Van der Roest, Henriëtte G.

AU - Gindin, Jacob

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