Porphyria cutanea tarda in an HCV-positive liver transplant patient: A case report

Adriano M. Pellicelli, Aldo Morrone, Luca Barbieri, Arnaldo Andreoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction. Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is the most common type of porphyria. The strong association between PCT and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is well established. Although antiviral treatment of chro-nic hepatitis C may improve PCT in some cases, de novo onset of PCT has been observed in patients under-going peginterferon/ribavirin treatment. We present a rare case of a genotype 3 HCV-positive liver transplant recipient who developed PCT during antiviral treatment and discuss its probable etiopathogene-sis. Case presentation. A genotype 3 HCV-positive liver transplant recipient, a 42-year-old man, was trea-ted with peginterferon alfa-2a (180 μg/week) combined with ribavirin (1,200 mg/day) for recurrence of HCV infection after liver transplantation. He presented with hyperferritinemia but tested negative for genetic hemochromatosis (C282Y and H63D mutations). During antiviral therapy, he developed skin lesions on his hands characterized by vesicles and erosions consistent with PCT. PCT was confirmed by skin biopsy and elevated urinary uroporphyrin levels (1,469 mg/24 h). He was treated with chloroquine (200 mg) twice weekly, resulting in gradual regression of the skin lesions. Antiviral treatment was stopped after 48 weeks, and the patient achieved a sustained virological response. In conclusion, we report an extremely rare case of PCT in a genotype 3 HCV-positive liver transplant patient treated with antiviral therapy. We believe that the combination of HCV genotype 3 infection; hemolysis due to ribavirin treatment; and increased plasma le-vels of cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNFα, could have altered the patient's iron metabolism and thus caused PCT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)951-954
Number of pages4
JournalAnnals of Hepatology
Volume11
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Porphyria Cutanea Tarda
Hepacivirus
Transplants
Liver
Antiviral Agents
Ribavirin
Genotype
Virus Diseases
Skin
Therapeutics
Uroporphyrins
Porphyrias
Hemochromatosis
Chloroquine
Hepatitis C
Hemolysis
Liver Transplantation
Interleukin-6
Iron
Hand

Keywords

  • Hemolysis
  • Hyperferritinemia
  • Pegylated interferon
  • Ribavirin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

Cite this

Porphyria cutanea tarda in an HCV-positive liver transplant patient : A case report. / Pellicelli, Adriano M.; Morrone, Aldo; Barbieri, Luca; Andreoli, Arnaldo.

In: Annals of Hepatology, Vol. 11, No. 6, 2012, p. 951-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pellicelli, AM, Morrone, A, Barbieri, L & Andreoli, A 2012, 'Porphyria cutanea tarda in an HCV-positive liver transplant patient: A case report', Annals of Hepatology, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 951-954.
Pellicelli, Adriano M. ; Morrone, Aldo ; Barbieri, Luca ; Andreoli, Arnaldo. / Porphyria cutanea tarda in an HCV-positive liver transplant patient : A case report. In: Annals of Hepatology. 2012 ; Vol. 11, No. 6. pp. 951-954.
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