Post-exercise facilitation and depression of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation: A study in multiple sclerosis

A. Perretti, P. Balbi, G. Orefice, L. Trojano, L. Marcantonio, V. Brescia-Morra, S. Ascione, F. Manganelli, G. Conte, L. Santoro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate motor cortex excitability changes by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) following repetitive muscle contractions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to state whether a typical pattern of post-exercise motor evoked potentials (MEPs) is related to clinical fatigue in MS. Methods: In 41 patients with definite MS (32 with fatigue and 9 without fatigue according to Fatigue Severity Scale) and 13 controls, MEPs were recorded at rest: at baseline condition, following repetitive contractions until fatigue, and after fatigue, to evaluate post-exercise MEP facilitation (PEF) and depression (PED). Results: After exercise, MEP amplitude significantly increased both in patients and controls (PEF). When fatigue set in, MEP amplitude was significantly reduced in normal subjects (PED), but not in patients. Post-exercise MEP findings were similar both in patients with and without fatigue. Conclusions: Our findings suggest an intracortical motor dysfunction following a voluntary contraction in MS patients, possibly due to failure of depression of facilitatory cortical circuits, or alternatively of inhibitory mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2128-2133
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume115
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Facilitation
  • Fatigue
  • Magnetic stimulation
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Post-exercise facilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)

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