Post-exercise facilitation and depression of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation: A study in multiple sclerosis

A. Perretti, P. Balbi, G. Orefice, L. Trojano, L. Marcantonio, V. Brescia-Morra, S. Ascione, F. Manganelli, G. Conte, L. Santoro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate motor cortex excitability changes by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) following repetitive muscle contractions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to state whether a typical pattern of post-exercise motor evoked potentials (MEPs) is related to clinical fatigue in MS. Methods: In 41 patients with definite MS (32 with fatigue and 9 without fatigue according to Fatigue Severity Scale) and 13 controls, MEPs were recorded at rest: at baseline condition, following repetitive contractions until fatigue, and after fatigue, to evaluate post-exercise MEP facilitation (PEF) and depression (PED). Results: After exercise, MEP amplitude significantly increased both in patients and controls (PEF). When fatigue set in, MEP amplitude was significantly reduced in normal subjects (PED), but not in patients. Post-exercise MEP findings were similar both in patients with and without fatigue. Conclusions: Our findings suggest an intracortical motor dysfunction following a voluntary contraction in MS patients, possibly due to failure of depression of facilitatory cortical circuits, or alternatively of inhibitory mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2128-2133
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume115
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

Fingerprint

Motor Evoked Potentials
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Multiple Sclerosis
Fatigue
Exercise
Motor Cortex
Muscle Contraction

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Facilitation
  • Fatigue
  • Magnetic stimulation
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Post-exercise facilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Neurology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Post-exercise facilitation and depression of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation : A study in multiple sclerosis. / Perretti, A.; Balbi, P.; Orefice, G.; Trojano, L.; Marcantonio, L.; Brescia-Morra, V.; Ascione, S.; Manganelli, F.; Conte, G.; Santoro, L.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 115, No. 9, 09.2004, p. 2128-2133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perretti, A, Balbi, P, Orefice, G, Trojano, L, Marcantonio, L, Brescia-Morra, V, Ascione, S, Manganelli, F, Conte, G & Santoro, L 2004, 'Post-exercise facilitation and depression of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation: A study in multiple sclerosis', Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 115, no. 9, pp. 2128-2133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2004.03.028
Perretti, A. ; Balbi, P. ; Orefice, G. ; Trojano, L. ; Marcantonio, L. ; Brescia-Morra, V. ; Ascione, S. ; Manganelli, F. ; Conte, G. ; Santoro, L. / Post-exercise facilitation and depression of motor evoked potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation : A study in multiple sclerosis. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2004 ; Vol. 115, No. 9. pp. 2128-2133.
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