Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with “all-inside” technique: A technical note

Corrado Bait, Matteo Denti, Emanuele Prospero, Alessandro Quaglia, Antonio Orgiani, Piero Volpi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are an increasingly recognized cause of knee instability in the practice of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. Clinical interest in these injuries has been increasing over the last several decades as knowledge and understanding of the biomechanical consequences and surgical reconstruction options have progressed. These injuries can be extremely challenging for the treating physician as substantial controversy exists regarding the optimal management of this problem. There has also been increasing interest and recognition of the importance of secondary stabilizing structures, including the posterolateral and posteromedial corner injuries as well as the issues with malalignment that must also be addressed at the time of PCL surgery to optimize results. Thanks to the continuous research for a correct anatomical placement and new systems of fixation, we can now perform the tibial and femoral bone tunnel more easily and safely by retrograde out-in approach with a special “drill-pin”Conclusion: this technique provides a graduated precise execution of the tunnels. New methods were also developed to determine the so-called “second-generation cortical suspensory fixations” that have the feature of being “Adjustable”: shortens implant by pulling on strands to allow cinching graft passing and tensioning button to regulate their length after fixation and then to create tension in the new graft, once introduced into the joint.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)467-470
Number of pages4
JournalMuscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Posterior Cruciate Ligament
Wounds and Injuries
Transplants
Sports Medicine
Mandrillus
Thigh
Orthopedics
Knee
Joints
Physicians
Bone and Bones
Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction
Research

Keywords

  • Alignment
  • Implant position
  • Knee arthroplasty
  • Patient specific
  • Unicompartmental

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with “all-inside” technique : A technical note. / Bait, Corrado; Denti, Matteo; Prospero, Emanuele; Quaglia, Alessandro; Orgiani, Antonio; Volpi, Piero.

In: Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2015, p. 467-470.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bait, Corrado ; Denti, Matteo ; Prospero, Emanuele ; Quaglia, Alessandro ; Orgiani, Antonio ; Volpi, Piero. / Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with “all-inside” technique : A technical note. In: Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 467-470.
@article{a4af45234d324331882314a84c803a02,
title = "Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with “all-inside” technique: A technical note",
abstract = "Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are an increasingly recognized cause of knee instability in the practice of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. Clinical interest in these injuries has been increasing over the last several decades as knowledge and understanding of the biomechanical consequences and surgical reconstruction options have progressed. These injuries can be extremely challenging for the treating physician as substantial controversy exists regarding the optimal management of this problem. There has also been increasing interest and recognition of the importance of secondary stabilizing structures, including the posterolateral and posteromedial corner injuries as well as the issues with malalignment that must also be addressed at the time of PCL surgery to optimize results. Thanks to the continuous research for a correct anatomical placement and new systems of fixation, we can now perform the tibial and femoral bone tunnel more easily and safely by retrograde out-in approach with a special “drill-pin”Conclusion: this technique provides a graduated precise execution of the tunnels. New methods were also developed to determine the so-called “second-generation cortical suspensory fixations” that have the feature of being “Adjustable”: shortens implant by pulling on strands to allow cinching graft passing and tensioning button to regulate their length after fixation and then to create tension in the new graft, once introduced into the joint.",
keywords = "Alignment, Implant position, Knee arthroplasty, Patient specific, Unicompartmental",
author = "Corrado Bait and Matteo Denti and Emanuele Prospero and Alessandro Quaglia and Antonio Orgiani and Piero Volpi",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.11138/mltj/2014.4.4.467",
language = "English",
volume = "4",
pages = "467--470",
journal = "Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal",
issn = "2240-4554",
publisher = "CIC Edizioni Internazionali",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Posterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with “all-inside” technique

T2 - A technical note

AU - Bait, Corrado

AU - Denti, Matteo

AU - Prospero, Emanuele

AU - Quaglia, Alessandro

AU - Orgiani, Antonio

AU - Volpi, Piero

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are an increasingly recognized cause of knee instability in the practice of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. Clinical interest in these injuries has been increasing over the last several decades as knowledge and understanding of the biomechanical consequences and surgical reconstruction options have progressed. These injuries can be extremely challenging for the treating physician as substantial controversy exists regarding the optimal management of this problem. There has also been increasing interest and recognition of the importance of secondary stabilizing structures, including the posterolateral and posteromedial corner injuries as well as the issues with malalignment that must also be addressed at the time of PCL surgery to optimize results. Thanks to the continuous research for a correct anatomical placement and new systems of fixation, we can now perform the tibial and femoral bone tunnel more easily and safely by retrograde out-in approach with a special “drill-pin”Conclusion: this technique provides a graduated precise execution of the tunnels. New methods were also developed to determine the so-called “second-generation cortical suspensory fixations” that have the feature of being “Adjustable”: shortens implant by pulling on strands to allow cinching graft passing and tensioning button to regulate their length after fixation and then to create tension in the new graft, once introduced into the joint.

AB - Introduction: Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries are an increasingly recognized cause of knee instability in the practice of orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. Clinical interest in these injuries has been increasing over the last several decades as knowledge and understanding of the biomechanical consequences and surgical reconstruction options have progressed. These injuries can be extremely challenging for the treating physician as substantial controversy exists regarding the optimal management of this problem. There has also been increasing interest and recognition of the importance of secondary stabilizing structures, including the posterolateral and posteromedial corner injuries as well as the issues with malalignment that must also be addressed at the time of PCL surgery to optimize results. Thanks to the continuous research for a correct anatomical placement and new systems of fixation, we can now perform the tibial and femoral bone tunnel more easily and safely by retrograde out-in approach with a special “drill-pin”Conclusion: this technique provides a graduated precise execution of the tunnels. New methods were also developed to determine the so-called “second-generation cortical suspensory fixations” that have the feature of being “Adjustable”: shortens implant by pulling on strands to allow cinching graft passing and tensioning button to regulate their length after fixation and then to create tension in the new graft, once introduced into the joint.

KW - Alignment

KW - Implant position

KW - Knee arthroplasty

KW - Patient specific

KW - Unicompartmental

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922341319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922341319&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.11138/mltj/2014.4.4.467

DO - 10.11138/mltj/2014.4.4.467

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84922341319

VL - 4

SP - 467

EP - 470

JO - Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal

JF - Muscles, Ligaments and Tendons Journal

SN - 2240-4554

IS - 4

ER -