Potential curability and perception of received information in esophageal cancer patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate patients’ perceived receipt of information according to the possibility of cure in esophageal cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients presenting at the multidisciplinary visit at the Veneto Institute of Oncology for esophageal cancer between 2014 and 2016 were included in the study. The Italian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaires C30 (core questionnaire), OG25 (esophago-gastric cancer module), and INFO25 (information module) were used. Results: Candidates for palliative treatment were less informed about the disease (adjusted mean difference − 11.5, 95% CI − 23.0 to − 0.02) and less satisfied with information provided (adjusted mean difference − 18.3, 95% CI − 31.9 to − 4.7) than candidates for curative treatment. In addition, candidates for palliative treatment wanted to receive more information than candidates for curative treatment (adjusted mean difference 26.1, 95% CI 0.5 to 51.6). Better quality of life was associated with satisfaction of received information (β = 0.77, p < 0.0001) and of receiving information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = 0.26, p = 0.04). More anxiety was associated to receiving more information about disease (β = 0.46, p = 0.02) but less information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = − 0.38, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Candidates for palliative treatment were less satisfied with information about the disease and wanted to receive more information. Additionally, some aspects of quality of life were found to be associated with perceived receipt of information. Appropriate training in communication of prognostic information may improve clinical management of incurable cancer patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Dec 19 2017

Fingerprint

Esophageal Neoplasms
Palliative Care
Quality of Life
Stomach Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Anxiety
Communication
Organizations
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cancer management
  • Communication
  • Esophageal cancer
  • Information
  • Quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

@article{d64a0e96766a4aea8123ecf54bc0e0d7,
title = "Potential curability and perception of received information in esophageal cancer patients",
abstract = "Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate patients’ perceived receipt of information according to the possibility of cure in esophageal cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients presenting at the multidisciplinary visit at the Veneto Institute of Oncology for esophageal cancer between 2014 and 2016 were included in the study. The Italian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaires C30 (core questionnaire), OG25 (esophago-gastric cancer module), and INFO25 (information module) were used. Results: Candidates for palliative treatment were less informed about the disease (adjusted mean difference − 11.5, 95{\%} CI − 23.0 to − 0.02) and less satisfied with information provided (adjusted mean difference − 18.3, 95{\%} CI − 31.9 to − 4.7) than candidates for curative treatment. In addition, candidates for palliative treatment wanted to receive more information than candidates for curative treatment (adjusted mean difference 26.1, 95{\%} CI 0.5 to 51.6). Better quality of life was associated with satisfaction of received information (β = 0.77, p < 0.0001) and of receiving information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = 0.26, p = 0.04). More anxiety was associated to receiving more information about disease (β = 0.46, p = 0.02) but less information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = − 0.38, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Candidates for palliative treatment were less satisfied with information about the disease and wanted to receive more information. Additionally, some aspects of quality of life were found to be associated with perceived receipt of information. Appropriate training in communication of prognostic information may improve clinical management of incurable cancer patients.",
keywords = "Cancer management, Communication, Esophageal cancer, Information, Quality of life",
author = "Eleonora Pinto and Francesco Cavallin and Rita Alfieri and Silvia Mantoan and Matteo Cagol and Carlo Castoro and Marco Scarpa",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-017-4005-0",
language = "English",
pages = "1--8",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential curability and perception of received information in esophageal cancer patients

AU - Pinto, Eleonora

AU - Cavallin, Francesco

AU - Alfieri, Rita

AU - Mantoan, Silvia

AU - Cagol, Matteo

AU - Castoro, Carlo

AU - Scarpa, Marco

PY - 2017/12/19

Y1 - 2017/12/19

N2 - Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate patients’ perceived receipt of information according to the possibility of cure in esophageal cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients presenting at the multidisciplinary visit at the Veneto Institute of Oncology for esophageal cancer between 2014 and 2016 were included in the study. The Italian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaires C30 (core questionnaire), OG25 (esophago-gastric cancer module), and INFO25 (information module) were used. Results: Candidates for palliative treatment were less informed about the disease (adjusted mean difference − 11.5, 95% CI − 23.0 to − 0.02) and less satisfied with information provided (adjusted mean difference − 18.3, 95% CI − 31.9 to − 4.7) than candidates for curative treatment. In addition, candidates for palliative treatment wanted to receive more information than candidates for curative treatment (adjusted mean difference 26.1, 95% CI 0.5 to 51.6). Better quality of life was associated with satisfaction of received information (β = 0.77, p < 0.0001) and of receiving information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = 0.26, p = 0.04). More anxiety was associated to receiving more information about disease (β = 0.46, p = 0.02) but less information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = − 0.38, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Candidates for palliative treatment were less satisfied with information about the disease and wanted to receive more information. Additionally, some aspects of quality of life were found to be associated with perceived receipt of information. Appropriate training in communication of prognostic information may improve clinical management of incurable cancer patients.

AB - Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate patients’ perceived receipt of information according to the possibility of cure in esophageal cancer. Methods: One hundred and twelve consecutive patients presenting at the multidisciplinary visit at the Veneto Institute of Oncology for esophageal cancer between 2014 and 2016 were included in the study. The Italian version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaires C30 (core questionnaire), OG25 (esophago-gastric cancer module), and INFO25 (information module) were used. Results: Candidates for palliative treatment were less informed about the disease (adjusted mean difference − 11.5, 95% CI − 23.0 to − 0.02) and less satisfied with information provided (adjusted mean difference − 18.3, 95% CI − 31.9 to − 4.7) than candidates for curative treatment. In addition, candidates for palliative treatment wanted to receive more information than candidates for curative treatment (adjusted mean difference 26.1, 95% CI 0.5 to 51.6). Better quality of life was associated with satisfaction of received information (β = 0.77, p < 0.0001) and of receiving information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = 0.26, p = 0.04). More anxiety was associated to receiving more information about disease (β = 0.46, p = 0.02) but less information about things that the patient can do to help himself (β = − 0.38, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Candidates for palliative treatment were less satisfied with information about the disease and wanted to receive more information. Additionally, some aspects of quality of life were found to be associated with perceived receipt of information. Appropriate training in communication of prognostic information may improve clinical management of incurable cancer patients.

KW - Cancer management

KW - Communication

KW - Esophageal cancer

KW - Information

KW - Quality of life

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038396215&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85038396215&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-017-4005-0

DO - 10.1007/s00520-017-4005-0

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85038396215

SP - 1

EP - 8

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

ER -