Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

Gabriella Moroni, Claudio Ponticelli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

For many years pregnancy has been contraindicated in patients with SLE, particularly when kidney involvement was present. Today, pregnancy is no longer considered impossible in women with lupus. Yet, lupus pregnancies are still considered high-risk. The prognosis has considerably improved for pregnant women but the fetal risk, although progressively reduced, is still higher in pregnancies of patients with SLE than in pregnancies of healthy women. Miscarriage, premature delivery, and preeclampsia, as well as heart problems in the baby are the major complications that can occur. In this paper we will review the outcome of pregnant women with SLE, the influence of lupus on fetal outcome, the effects of pregnancy on lupus, and the management of pregnant lupus patients based on our personal experience and the revision of the most recent and significant papers on the subject.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Internal Medicine
Volume32
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2016

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Spontaneous Abortion
Pregnancy Outcome
Pre-Eclampsia
Kidney

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). / Moroni, Gabriella; Ponticelli, Claudio.

In: European Journal of Internal Medicine, Vol. 32, 01.07.2016, p. 7-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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