Prescription drug use among older adults in Italy: A country-wide perspective

Graziano Onder, Davide Liborio Vetrano, Antonio Cherubini, Massimo Fini, Pier Mannuccio Mannucci, Alessandra Marengoni, Alessandro Monaco, Alessandro Nobili, Sergio Pecorelli, Pierluigi Russo, Cristiana Vitale, Roberto Bernabei

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Italy, prescription drug costs represent approximately 17% of total public health expenditures. Older adults commonly use multiple drugs and, for this reason, this population is responsible for a large portion of drug-related costs. In 2012, public expenditure for pharmaceuticals in primary care exceeded 11 billion Euros (approximately 15.2 billion US $), and older adults aged 65 or older accounted for more than 60% of these costs. Recently, increased attention has been focused on studies aimed at monitoring drug use and evaluating the appropriateness of drug prescribing in older adults. In this article, we examined studies that assessed these issues in different settings at a national level. Specifically, results of surveys of prescription drug use in primary care (OsMED), hospital (GIFA, CRIME, and REPOSI) and long-term care (ULISSE and SHELTER) settings are reviewed. Overall, these studies showed that the quality of drug prescribing in older patients is far from optimal. This leads to an increased risk of negative health outcomes and increased health care costs. Data from these studies are valuable, not only to monitor drug use, but also to target interventions aimed at improving the quality of prescribing. Translating the findings of clinical research and monitoring programs will be challenging, but it will lead to quantifiable improvements in the quality of drug prescribing at a national level.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the American Medical Directors Association
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Drug Prescriptions
Prescription Drugs
Italy
Drug Costs
Health Expenditures
Primary Health Care
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Drug Monitoring
Long-Term Care
Quality Improvement
Health Care Costs
Public Health
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health
Research
Population

Keywords

  • Appropriateness
  • Elderly
  • Italy
  • Medication use
  • Polypharmacy
  • Prescription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Nursing(all)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Prescription drug use among older adults in Italy : A country-wide perspective. / Onder, Graziano; Vetrano, Davide Liborio; Cherubini, Antonio; Fini, Massimo; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Marengoni, Alessandra; Monaco, Alessandro; Nobili, Alessandro; Pecorelli, Sergio; Russo, Pierluigi; Vitale, Cristiana; Bernabei, Roberto.

In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, Vol. 15, No. 7, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Onder, Graziano ; Vetrano, Davide Liborio ; Cherubini, Antonio ; Fini, Massimo ; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio ; Marengoni, Alessandra ; Monaco, Alessandro ; Nobili, Alessandro ; Pecorelli, Sergio ; Russo, Pierluigi ; Vitale, Cristiana ; Bernabei, Roberto. / Prescription drug use among older adults in Italy : A country-wide perspective. In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association. 2014 ; Vol. 15, No. 7.
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