INDICAZIONI E LIMITI ATTUALI DELL'ARTERIOGRAFIA NELLA DIAGNOSTICA DELLA MALATTIE DEL PACREAS ESOCRINO

Translated title of the contribution: Present limits and indications of arteriography in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic diseases

C. Mansi, V. Savarino, G. Mallarini, G. De Caro, R. Testa, A. Picciotto, G. Celle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The authors carried out a retrospective study to assess the role of angiography in investigating exocrine pancreatic disease. 121 patients, 20 of which normal, 65 with chronic pancreatitis and 36 with pancreatic cancer were examined. In chronic pancreatitis, the diagnostic usefulness of angiography proved to be restricted due to the fact that, although non-specific angiographic abnormalities were found in 78% of cases, pathognomonic changes that were sufficiently indicative of the nature of the disease were present in only 21% of the patients. On the other hand, in the pancreatic cancers, a correct diagnosis was possible in 63,8% of the cases and in 25% only non-specific signs were present. The false positive rate was 35%, whilst in 8 patients (12%) with chronic pancreatitis a neoplasm wa erroneously diagnosed. The authors conclude that angiography has its correct utilization in patients suspected of having a pancreatic neoplasm, which has not been diagnosed in any other way. The value of angiography is also emphasized estimating the operability of the patients with cancer and, more generally, in defining the preoperative estimation of patients suffering from pancreatic disease.

Translated title of the contributionPresent limits and indications of arteriography in the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic diseases
Original languageItalian
Pages (from-to)201-208
Number of pages8
JournalMinerva Chirurgica
Volume37
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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