Present Status of Musculoskeletal Radiology in Europe: International Survey by the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology

Žiga Snoj, Timea Hebar, Luca Maria Sconfienza, Filip Maria H.M. Vanhoenacker, Maryam Shahabpour, Vladka Salapura, Amanda Isaac, Eleni Drakonaki, Yurii Vasilev, Jean Luc Drape, Miraude Adriaensen, Klaus Friedrich, Giuseppe Guglielmi, Alberto Vieira, Hatice Tuba Sanal, Liisa Kerttula, Johan Castberg Hellund, Judit Nagy, Andreas Hueck, Matthieu RuttenMaria Tzalonikou, Ulrich Hansen, Joanna Niemunis-Sawicka, Fabio Becce, Enzo Silverstri, Eva Llopis San Juan, Klaus Wörtler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

No official data exist on the status of musculoskeletal (MSK) radiology in Europe. The Committee for National Societies conducted an international survey to understand the status of training, subspecialization, and local practice among the European Society of Musculoskeletal Radiology (ESSR) partner societies. This article reports the results of that survey. An online questionnaire was distributed to all 26 European national associations that act as official partner societies of the ESSR. The 24 questions were subdivided into six sections: Society structure, relationship with the national radiological society, subspecialization, present radiology practice, MSK interventional procedures, and MSK ultrasound. The findings of our study show a lack of standardized training and/or accreditation methods in the field of MSK radiology at a national level. The European diploma in musculoskeletal radiology is directed to partly overcome this problem; however, this certification is still underrecognized. Using certification methods, a more homogeneous European landscape could be created in the future with a view to subspecialist training. MSK ultrasound and MSK interventional procedures should be performed by a health professional with a solid knowledge of the relevant imaging modalities and sufficient training in MSK radiology. Recognition of MSK radiology as an official subspecialty would make the field more attractive for younger colleagues as well as attracting the brightest and best, an important key to further development of both clinical and academic radiology. Key Points Standardized training and/or accreditation methods in the field of MSK radiology is lacking at a national level. With certification methods, such as the European diploma in musculoskeletal radiology, a more homogeneous European landscape could be created in the future with a view to subspecialist training. Recognition of MSK radiology as an official subspecialty would make the field more attractive for younger colleagues as well as attracting the brightest and best, an important key to further development of both clinical and academic radiology.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-330
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Musculoskeletal Radiology
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • accreditation
  • certification
  • musculoskeletal system
  • radiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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