Prevalence and characteristics of nonblanching, palpable skin lesions with a linear pattern in children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome

Gregorio P. Milani, Sebastiano A.G. Lava, Vera Ramelli, Mario G. Bianchetti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Linear nonblanching skin lesions are thought to occur very rarely in patients with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence and characteristics of linear nonblanching skin lesions in children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A prospective case series was conducted at the ambulatory practice of a hospitalist between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2015, among 31 consecutive children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-one consecutive children affected with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome who were from 3.0 to 12.0 years of age (median age, 6.2 years). MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURES: Children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome underwent a careful, structured skin examination established in advance with emphasis on the presence of palpable lesions with a linear pattern. RESULTS: Among the 31 children in the study (12 girls and 19 boys; median age, 6.2 years [range, 3.0-12.0 years]), 8 (26%) had linear lesions on the legs, groin, waistline, wrists, or forearms. Patients with or without linear lesions did not differ significantly with respect to sex, age, and cutaneous, abdominal, articular, or renal involvement. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study illustrates the prevalence and characteristics of linear skin lesions in patients with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome. Patients with symptoms suggestive of this vasculitis should be evaluated for the presence of nonblanching, palpable lesions with a linear pattern.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1170-1173
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA Dermatology
Volume153
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence and characteristics of nonblanching, palpable skin lesions with a linear pattern in children with Henoch-Schönlein syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this